Why is there a Red Sox plane parked at Palm Beach International?

Yes, that plane at Palm Beach International Airport does have the Boston Red Sox logo on it.

There’s a good reason for that: It belongs to Red Sox minority owner Phillip Morse.

What's the story behind this plane with the logo of the Boston Red Sox on the tail? (Contributed)
What’s the story behind this plane with the logo of the Boston Red Sox on the tail? (Contributed)

Morse — who serves as vice chairman for Fenway Sports Group, the John Henry-led group that owns the Sox — lives on an estate valued at nearly $1.3 million in Jupiter.

The 5,200-square-foot home sits on a half-acre in the Loxahatchee Club community.

His plane, a 1991 Gulfstream IV, can often be spotted from Southern Boulevard, where it parks near the south side of the airport. 

Three readers have contacted this reporter in recent weeks — possibly because I’m the transportation reporter, but more likely because I’m a Red Sox fan — asking where the plane is from and to whom it belongs. Some thought it could belong to Henry, who owns a home in suburban Boca Raton.

 

 

 

 

 

Rio Olympics 2016: Post writer tries out Olympic sport of archery

photo carlos archery
Carlos Frias shows off his bullseye at the indoor range at Palm Beach Archery in west Boca Raton. (Damon Higgons/The Palm Beach Post)

To pay honor to the Rio Olympics 2016, we bring back several stories where our Post writer tried out some of the less heard of sports.

In 2012, Post staff writer Carlos Frías set out on his personal pentathlon to discover some of the 2012 Summer Games’ more obscure sports. The Olympic sport feature here: Archery.

An excerpt from the 2012 original story:

I pull back on the bow loaded with a carbon-fiber arrow, and archery coach John Bowersox gives me one last piece of advice as I line up the target:

“I want you to imagine the fate of the world rests on this shot,” he says. “How’s that for pressure?”

This is a little game he plays with the scores of children who have signed up for archery lessons at Palm Beach Archery since the movies Brave and The Hunger Games made little girls into arrow-slinging heroes. It’s how he ends his lessons.

Read the rest of his story and find out more about Carlos’ archery skills, read: One gutsy guy’s personal pentathlon

Here are his previous stories on javelin and table tennis.

Rio Olympics 2016: Post writer takes on Olympic sport of synchronized swimming!

photo synchronized swimming
Palm Beach Post reporter Carlos Frias practices synchronized swimming skills with the Palm Beach Coralytes at Aqua Crest Pool. (Thomas Cordy/The Palm Beach Post)

To pay honor to the Rio Olympics 2016, we bring back several stories where our Post writer tried out some of the less heard of sports.

In 2012, Post staff writer Carlos Frías set out on his personal pentathlon to discover some of the 2012 Summer Games’ more obscure sports. The Olympic sport feature here: synchronized swimming.

An excerpt from the 2012 original story:

Synchronized swimming is the hardest sport in the world.

I promised Jacki Barrett, head coach of the Palm Beach Coralytes swim team, that sentence would make the story after I yelled the very phrase toward God in heaven, while trying to tread water for more than 10 minutes in an egg-beater pattern. After an hour desperately trying not to drown doing the most basic moves that the cute, patient, athletic, funny 12-to-14-year-old girls around me did with such precision and ease, I thought I owed them enough to make it the very first sentence.

Read the rest of his story and find out more about Carlos’ swimming skills, read: “Carlos: More sink than synch”

Here are his previous stories on archery and table tennis and javelin throwing.

Rio Olympics 2016: Post writer tries out Olympic sport of table tennis

photo olympic table tennis
Carlos Frias plays table tennis with coach Jose Gonzalez-Posada (right) at Olympic Heights High School in west Boca Raton. (Bruce R. Bennett/The Palm Beach Post)

To pay honor to the Rio Olympics 2016, we bring back several stories where our Post writer tried out some of the less heard of sports.

In 2012, Post staff writer Carlos Frías set out on his personal pentathlon to discover some of the 2012 Summer Games’ more obscure sports. The Olympic sport feature here: Table Tennis.

An excerpt from the 2012 original story:

At seven tables, the members of the Palm Beach Table Tennis club are already inducing vertigo as they slam iridescent orange balls back and forth at something close to light speed. Well, that’s the way it looks, anyway, for someone who wants to stand in that line of fire.

Jose Gonzalez-Posada knows I’m not ready for that just yet. Playing since he was 14, Gonzalez-Posada, now the man in charge of the club, knows what I need first are lessons. Because my technique is a lot like yours, the average person who plays table tennis at a friend’s house. That is, I have none.

Read the rest of his story and find out more about Carlos’ table tennis skills, read: Carlos takes on a racquet: Slap it, don’t smack it

Here are his previous stories on javelin and archery.

5 ways to get cheap, discount tickets to the Honda Classic

Praying for cheap tickets to this week’s Honda Classic?

Here’s how to get in for (a little) less:

Rory McIllroy misses a put during the 2014 Honda Classic in Palm Beach Gardens. (Post photo/Bill Ingram)
Rory McIlroy reacts to a missed putt during the 2014 Honda Classic in Palm Beach Gardens. (Post photo/Bill Ingram)

1. Buy online and use your MasterCard:  Grounds tickets for Thursday through Sunday are $50.  Buy online here to save the $10 add-on at the gate. Charging it to your MasterCard saves another 10 percent.

2.  Get a small-group package here.

A Party Pack for two includes two passes for any day plus a parking pass and two drink coupons for $89. Saves $22.

Pick up a Family Fore-pack that includes two adult tickets and two kids one-day passes, plus parking pass and four lunch coupons for $109.  Saves $28.

Buy a Party Fore-pack that includes four one-day tickets, and four drink coupons for $139.  Saves $105.

Daily tickets to various grandstand viewing areas and hospitality tents, including the Gosling’s Dark ‘N Stormy Bear Trap, Cobra Puma Golf Village, Waterford Club @17 and Champions Club range from $325-$400.

Parking passes are $10 to $20 a daygeneral parking is free if you’re driving a Honda or Acura.

Other ways to save?

A World War II vet watches the action from the Patriots Outpost during last year's Honda Classic.
A World War II vet watches the action from the Patriots’ Outpost during last year’s Honda Classic.

3. Be active duty military or a veteran. 

With ID, active duty military are admitted free with their dependents to the Patriots’ Outpost hospitality tent where complimentary lunch and snacks are provided each day.

Veterans get one complimentary ticket per day.

All current and former military can also purchase up to two daily tickets for $20 each.

Register here for complimentary military tickets. Military ID required for entrance.

 

Kids and adults vie for Tiger Woods' autograph during last year's Honda Classic. Children 15 and under are admitted free with a paid adult. (Post photo/Rich Graulich)
Kids 15 and under are admitted free to the Honda Classic, with a paid adult.
(Post photo/Rich Graulich)

4.  Be a child 15 or under, who get in free with a paid adult.

 

The Honda Classic at PGA National runs February 22 through Sunday, February 28.

Check out our PGA dining guide on where to eat during the Honda Classic.

And since golf is thirsty business, here are tips on where to drink.

And don’t forget to check out our Honda Classic photo gallery. We’ll be adding to it each day of the tournament.