9 Palm Beach County road trips to try this summer

(Photo: Allen Eyestone/Palm Beach Post)
(Photo: Allen Eyestone/Palm Beach Post)

With summer officially here, it’s time to get into the car and hit the great American highway for a road trip to remember.

Destination: Palm Beach County?

With staycations all the rage, you don’t have to go far to add a scenic drive to your summer bucket list. Within the broad borders of the county, there is more to see than you might think.

From Jupiter to Boca to the western communities, you can gaze upon the natural splendor of ocean, waterways and lakes. Or check out man-made marvels, from ultra-expensive houses to tiny trailers. And stop along the way to dine, shop or take a nature hike.

Most important of all, you can see the place you live in a whole new light. These drives are perfect for a weekend afternoon — or even your lunch hour.

Let’s go road trippin’.

GAS UP AND GO ON OUR PALM BEACH COUNTY ROAD TRIPS!

Census statistics: Putting our new 1.4 million population in perspective

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Welcome, newcomers. The Palm Beach Post is reporting that recent Census Bureau estimates place the population of Palm Beach County at 1.4 million people. (1,422,789 to be exact.)

Wondering why roads are so crowded and you can’t get a table at your favorite restaurant?

One-point-four million. That’s a lot of people, or anything, for that matter.

Here are some other things that have recently added up to 1.4 million:

New York City has 1.4 million arrest warrants that have not been served. According to a PBS report, they are “unresolved summonses dating back to the 1980’s. They’re for “quality of life” offenses like loitering, public urination, walking a dog without a leash, or being in a park after dark.”

Showtime’s recent series “Billions” had 1.4 million viewers for its debut episode in January.

About 1.4 million dogs are adopted every year.

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About 1.4 million people attend Mardi Gras every year.

The GOP Republican primary in Illinois drew 1.4 million voters, according to the Associated Press.

The Golden Globes were tweeted about 1.4 million times (that’s a lot of Ricky Gervais jokes.)

About 1.4 million cases of diabetes are diagnosed each year, according to the American Diabetes Association.

Don’t slip on this: 1.4 million shower rugs were recently recalled.

1.4 million people die in India each year because of polluted air.

And speaking of statistics, here’s a disquieting one tweeted by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson late last year:

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Bruce Springsteen announces autobiography: The Boss’ connections to Palm Beach County

Bruce Springsteen announced today that he’s writing his autobiography titled — what else — Born to Run. It will be released in September. It’s a big year for Boss fans — his “The River” tour comes to BB+ T Center in Sunrise on Tuesday.

Springsteen has a lot of connections to Palm Beach County — will they end up in his memoir?

 

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Bruce Springsteen and Clarence Clemons play Miami’s Orange Bowl in 1985 (Miami News)

No one would have believed that Jersey boy Springsteen would one day own a horse farm in Wellington, or tool around Lake O on his chopper. Or that his iconic Big Man, Clarence Clemons, who died in 2011, would have a luxury condo on Singer Island or that drummer Max Weinberg would buy a house on Palm Beach’s north end.

Through the years, The Post has written a number of stories about Springsteen’s and Clemons’ presence in Palm Beach County.

Here are some:

A “Thunder Road” trip – Bruce Springsteen, a bar and the big lake.”

Clarence Clemons:  Remembering the “Big Man” at home on Singer Island.

Clarence Clemons in a 2009 Palm Beach Post photo.
Clarence Clemons in a 2009 Palm Beach Post photo.

In 2005, Clemons talked to former Post reporter Anne Rodgers about his memories of “Born to Run.”

Here’s an excerpt from that interview:

Question: Why has Born to Run held up so well?

Clarence Clemons: Because of the purity and the energy and the life that went into it. You can’t destroy energy. You can’t take it away. When you do something earnestly and truthfully, it lasts.

Q: What do you remember about that cover pose?
CC: I set the pose up. I stood up and struck a pose and Bruce leaned in on me. And it was perfect. When we’re together it just happens that way. We don’t hang out all the time, but when we get together, we see something in each other and it’s magic. The spontaneity jumps all over the place. From the first time I met him, I had that feeling.

Q: When did you know the album was huge?CC: When Time and Newsweek put Bruce on the cover the same week.

Q: How did you feel about the fame?
CC: We hated it! It was too much exposure too soon. We wondered how we were supposed to act. Were we supposed to be different? What should I wear? We were just a bunch of guys from Jersey.

Q: How do you feel about the cover shot today? (It splits the image, with Springsteen on the front and Clemons on the back.)
CC: It’s kind of been a nemesis. My face was on the back. Why not on the front? What’s up with that? My mom was apprehensive about me going into rock and roll. I had a strict religious background and here I was leaving my job and family to follow this dream. She always said, ‘Keep your day job.’ So finally Born to Run comes out and it’s huge and I showed it to my mom and she said, ‘Your behind’s on the cover!’
The promotions all had the whole picture, it was a big thing showing brotherhood between black and white . . . a big statement in rock and roll. But on the album, my face is on the back. I think Bruce really envisioned it would be the whole cover, but somewhere along the line it got changed. I was disappointed, but it was OK. What was inside was better than what was on the outside. We moved on. It didn’t faze me and didn’t affect my contribution to Bruce and the music.