Why is there a Red Sox plane parked at Palm Beach International?

Yes, that plane at Palm Beach International Airport does have the Boston Red Sox logo on it.

There’s a good reason for that: It belongs to Red Sox minority owner Phillip Morse.

What's the story behind this plane with the logo of the Boston Red Sox on the tail? (Contributed)
What’s the story behind this plane with the logo of the Boston Red Sox on the tail? (Contributed)

Morse — who serves as vice chairman for Fenway Sports Group, the John Henry-led group that owns the Sox — lives on an estate valued at nearly $1.3 million in Jupiter.

The 5,200-square-foot home sits on a half-acre in the Loxahatchee Club community.

His plane, a 1991 Gulfstream IV, can often be spotted from Southern Boulevard, where it parks near the south side of the airport. 

Three readers have contacted this reporter in recent weeks — possibly because I’m the transportation reporter, but more likely because I’m a Red Sox fan — asking where the plane is from and to whom it belongs. Some thought it could belong to Henry, who owns a home in suburban Boca Raton.

 

 

 

 

 

Cool weather is here! Check out some of the best outdoor things to do in Palm Beach County

With the cool front that’s heading our way, the weather will be near perfect this weekend! Low humidity. Mostly sunny! So, what better time to get outside and play! And we’ve got a great list of options for you!

Wanna hit a beach and enjoy the sun?

Best Beaches of Palm Beach County

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Riviera Beach Municipal Beach. (Allen Eyestone/The Palm Beach Post)

Sip a cocktail and dine with a view? Oh yes, please!

A table with a view: Best al fresco dining spots

A table by the sea at the new Breeze Ocean Kitchen, located at the Eau Palm Beach Resort in Manalapan. (Liz Balmaseda/ Palm Beach Post)
A table by the sea at the new Breeze Ocean Kitchen, located at the Eau Palm Beach Resort in Manalapan. (Liz Balmaseda/ Palm Beach Post)

What about a bike ride?

Five furious off-road bike trails in Palm Beach County

Daryll McKenzie, heads down the hill with riders behind him during the Sandblaster Mountain Bike Race Series at Dyer Park. (Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)
Daryll McKenzie, heads down the hill with riders behind him during the Sandblaster Mountain Bike Race Series at Dyer Park. (Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)

Want to get your zen on? A beautiful garden or park will help with that!

Best public gardens and best parks in Palm Beach County

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The Mounts Botanical Garden in West Palm Beach. (Lannis Waters/The Palm Beach Post)

Take a road trip with the top down? We’ve got you covered!

Behind the wheel: Most scenic drives in Palm Beach County

A camper at the Pahokee Marina and Campground on Lake Okeechobee in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
A camper at the Pahokee Marina and Campground on Lake Okeechobee in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

Going by boat? Wanna tie up for a sunset sip or an afternoon burger?

Dock and dine: Best waterfront dining 

The view of the Jupiter Lighthouse from Jetty's restaurant in Jupiter.  (Richard Graulich/The Palm Beach Post)
The view of the Jupiter Lighthouse from Jetty’s restaurant in Jupiter. (Richard Graulich/The Palm Beach Post)

Want to find the perfect scene for your Instagram pic of the day? or weekend?

10 best Instagram-worthy spots in North Palm Beach County

Behind the wheel: Best scenic drives in Palm Beach County

Winding, leisurely or quirky, these are the best scenic drives that show you the marvels of Palm Beach County.

With great weather finally here, it’s time to get into the car and hit the great American highway for a road trip to remember. Destination: Palm Beach County?

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Ficus Nitida is the species of trees lining bridge road on Jupiter Island. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)

With staycations all the rage, you don’t have to go far to add a scenic drive to your road trip bucket list. Within the broad borders of the county, there is more to see than you might think.

From Jupiter to Boca to the western communities, you can gaze upon the natural splendor of ocean, waterways and lakes. Or check out man-made marvels, from ultra-expensive houses to tiny trailers. And stop along the way to dine, shop or take a nature hike.

Most important of all, you can see the place you live in a whole new light. These drives are perfect for a weekend afternoon — or even your lunch hour.

Let’s go road trippin’!

ROAD TRIP NO. 1: A1A, from Palm Beach to Boca Raton

Length: 30 miles

Start/stop: Begin at Worth Avenue and A1A/S. Ocean Boulevard in Palm Beach and head south until you hit Deerfield Beach (with a few stops along the way).

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The thick coastal hammock of mangrove trees at the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton. (Photo by Steve Lopez)

Why this drive delights: This is the Big Kahuna of Palm Beach County scenic drives, winding through the gilded splendor of Palm Beach, past endless (and we mean endless) condos and mega-mansions. You’ll see funky beach towns, a funky trailer park town, and sweet, seagrape-swept views of the Atlantic and Intracoastal Waterway. This is bucket list material. Honestly, if you haven’t taken this drive, you need to ask yourself: Why am I living in Palm Beach County?

 9 sights to see:

1. As you’re heading south through Palm Beach, say hi to The Donald. You can usually get a brief eyeful of the architectural details and big gate of President Donald Trump’s shack, Mar-A-Lago (1100 S. Ocean Blvd.)

Related: A look inside Mar-A-Lago

The Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach is partially visible over its tall hedges on S. Ocean Boulevard. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
The Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach is partially visible over its tall hedges on S. Ocean Boulevard. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

2. Most condos on this drive are tall and dramatically boring, with faux posh names, but we’re partial to two between Sloan’s Curve and Lake Worth: The ’60s mod-looking President of Palm Beach (2505 S. Ocean Blvd., not to be confused with Trump’s house) and the cool white Regency of Palm Beach (2760 S. Ocean Blvd.).

3. When you reach Lake Worth, take a quick left into the Lake Worth Beach complex (10 S. Ocean Blvd.). It’s a good place to grab a bite, and check out the ocean scene. Despite all the upgrades, the pier still looks vintage-funky.

4. As you pass through Manalapan, you get some nice glimpses of the Intracoastal. And ponder this: Have you ever driven this stretch of A1A when half of the oceanside properties are not in tear-down mode?

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Ocean Inlet Park at Ocean Ridge. (Palm Beach Post file photo)

5. Between Manalapan and Ocean Inlet Park (6990 N. Ocean Blvd., Boynton Beach), there is a lovely, shady stretch of canopied trees and seagrape splendor. The beach-changing houses here along the ocean are probably nicer than your entire home. Roll down the window, take your foot off the gas and enjoy it.

6. Past Boynton, take a jog left on Corrine Street, right on Old Ocean Boulevard and head down to the marvelous mystery of A1A: How does a trailer town still exist here? With views of both the Atlantic and the Intracoastal? Briny Breezes is one of those places where you can test a relationship theory. Drive down tight little Hibiscus Street, with quaint mobile homes on both sides. By the time you get to the end at the town library and shuffleboard court, one spouse will be ready to chuck all the hassles of suburban home ownership and move right in. The other spouse will be ready to chuck you for suggesting it.

The Lake Worth Casino at Lake Worth Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
The Lake Worth Casino at Lake Worth Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

7. As you pass through the town of Gulf Stream, look up. Towering pines flank the roadway.

8. By this point in the trip, you may be weary of looking at condos blocking the ocean view. Delray Beach’s commercial district at Atlantic Avenue is made for a stop-and-shop. Or head down to Boca Raton’s numerous beach parks and the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center (1801 N. Ocean Blvd.).

9. You’re almost there. Past the Boca Raton Resort and Club and over the drawbridge and you’re into Deerfield Beach, the end of your journey. Except you have to turn around and go all the way back. But it was worth it, right?

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ROAD TRIP NO. 2: Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach

Length: 10-12 miles
Start/Stop: North Flagler near Northwood Road. Go south to South Flagler and Arlington Place.
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Currie Park on N. Flagler Drive in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: Beginning near the pastel-colored shopping and restaurant district along Northwood Road, this leisurely drive takes you past calming views of the Intracoastal, and the glittering downtown commercial district of condos, restaurants and waterside walkways. Once you get through downtown, settle into the most relaxing part of the drive, a non-stop travel reel of upscale homes with broad lawns, a mishmash of funky architectural styles, and a sweet walkway along the Intracoastal (though the road section south of Southern definitely needs repaving). By the time you get to South Flagler’s terminus at Arlington Place, your blood pressure should be a lot lower. And you can do it in less than an hour.
George S. Petty Park on Washington Road in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
George S. Petty Park on Washington Road in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

5 sights to see:

1. Don’t miss the curved, copper-colored dome of Temple Beth El (2815 N. Flagler), built in 1970 and a hidden architectural jewel of the city.

2. Pull into Currie Park, at N. Flagler and 23rd Street, and watch boats speeding down the Intracoastal Waterway and people walking along the park’s well-maintained shoreline. (Other nearby sights include the Palm Beach Maritime Museum and the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial).

Palm Beach Maritime Museum on N. Flagler Drive in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
Palm Beach Maritime Museum on N. Flagler Drive in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
3. When downtown (which might require a slight detour because of construction on the north bridge), stop and gawk at the mega-yachts perched at Palm Harbor Marina (400 N. Flagler).
4. Glimpse our favorite sign on a church: “No Skate Boarding Allowed” posted on the front of the historic First Church of Christ Scientist (809 S. Flagler), built in 1928 in a grandiose Classical Revival style, where the steep steps are apparently an irresistible temptation to board riders.
5. A moment of Zen: the pocket-like George S. Petty Park (Washington Road at Royal Park Road), though in truth all of the El Cid-Southland Park area is pretty Zen if you’re into gazing at expensive homes and condos. We’re partial to the tower-like house at Washington and Westminster. (An FYI on directions: Flagler turns into Washington, then converts back to Flagler via Greenwood Avenue a little farther south. Why? We don’t know, either.)
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ROAD TRIP NO. 3: Jupiter to Juno Beach

Length: 15 miles
Start/Stop: Begin at U.S. 1 and Indiantown Road, Jupiter. Go south on U.S. 1 to A1A/Ocean Drive, Juno Beach. Then turn left/north on A1A all the way back to U.S. 1 and A1A, Jupiter.
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Boats pass by Jupiter Lighthouse. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: This trip beginning on U.S. 1 south of Harbourside Place reflects a lot of what makes north county coastal living unique. There is the chance to see great swaths of dunes and undeveloped land in the middle of the usual commercial and residential development. Once you turn north onto A1A in Juno Beach, it’s a laid-back drive of condos, parks, seagrapes and glimpses of the Atlantic, all populated by north county’s legion of bicyclists, surfers and beachgoers. You’ll also eyeball such familiar landmarks as the Juno Beach Pier, Carlin Park and the Jupiter Lighthouse.
Pelican Lake. (Palm Beach Post file photo)
Pelican Lake. (Palm Beach Post file photo)

4 sights to see:

1. The Jupiter Ridge Natural Area(1800 S. U.S. 1), a 271-acre slash and scrub pine preserve that is worth a hike or run along its boardwalk and sandy trails. The county purchased it for $23 million in 1993. (A little farther down U.S. 1 is another stop and walk spot: the Juno Dunes Natural Area (14501 U.S. 1), as well as the Loggerhead Marine Life Center, 14200 U.S. 1).
2. In Juno Beach, make a quick right off A1A/Ocean Drive onto Celestial Way, the town center of Juno Beach. This is your Zen moment: A 1-mile pathway winds around Pelican Lake with two gazebos, and lots of ducks and wading birds to see. Stop and take a walk.
Diners enjoy the intracoastal views at Guanabanas restaurant in Jupiter. (Richard Graulich/The Palm Beach Post)
Diners enjoy the intracoastal views at Guanabanas restaurant in Jupiter. (Richard Graulich/The Palm Beach Post)
3. Right after the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, turn right on Jupiter Beach Park Road and take a winding ride through the beach park (1375 Jupiter Beach Road), which terminates with a gobsmacking view of the Jupiter Inlet and Atlantic Ocean. You can also walk here to adjacent Dubois Park, one of the best places to take in picture-perfect views of the Jupiter Lighthouse.
4. At the end of your trip, you hit the commercial bottleneck of restaurants and bars Guanabana’s Schooner’s, Square Grouper, Jetty’s, etc.). It might be worth it to end your ride here with a walk up tiny, funky Love Street (don’t miss the handpainted sign with lyrics to The Doors’ “Love Street”). With all the new commercial development plans, it may not stay funky for long.
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ROAD TRIP NO 4.: The Glades

Length: 37 miles
Start/Stop: Go west on Southern Boulevard past Lion Country Safari as it turns into U.S. 441. Once you get to the end of the road, turn right to Pahokee, where you can end your trip at Lake Okeechobee.
Royal palm trees line SR 715 in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
Royal palm trees line SR 715 in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: You can live in Palm Beach County for decades and rarely make a drive out to the Glades. That is a mistake. Head west on Southern Boulevard and, all of a sudden, it’s like the difference between watching a movie on an iPhone and seeing it blown up on an IMAX screen. The sky is bigger. The clouds are bigger. The horizon line of green fields and the Glades’ famous black muck soil goes on forever, interrupted only by giant power lines and the occasional belching smokestack. Driving out U.S. 441, you realize how much development blots out your broader vision of the world. Take your kids and have a teachable moment in how your food is grown and harvested.
A camper at the Pahokee Marina and Campground on Lake Okeechobee in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
A camper at the Pahokee Marina and Campground on Lake Okeechobee in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

2 sights to see:

1. Stop in at Paul Rardin Park (4600 State Road 715). A steep (very steep) road leads up to the boat ramp and an overlook of the lake. You can walk along the dike and join other park goers sitting on the bank and enjoying the scenery.
2. Driving into Pahokee, you might be surprised to find the road lined with as many palm trees as you’ll find on Palm Beach. Once you arrive downtown, turn left into the Pahokee Marina and Campground (190 N. Lake Ave.), a perfect place to gaze on the enormity of the big lake and end your road trip. (Wondering whether to invest the time? Hey, Bruce Springsteen made this trip on his chopper a couple years ago, and if it’s good enough for the Boss …)
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ROAD TRIP NO. 5: Dixie Highway through West Palm Beach/Lake Worth/Lantana

Length: 7. 2 miles
Start/Stop: S. Dixie Highway and Belvedere Road, West Palm Beach, south to Dixie Highway and Ocean Avenue, Lantana
West Palm Beach's Carvel ice cream cone sign on Dixie Highway. (Madeline Gray/The Palm Beach Post)
West Palm Beach’s Carvel ice cream cone sign on Dixie Highway. (Madeline Gray/The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: What’s scenic is in the eye of the beholder. Even a busy commercial highway has its charms. We could have picked Military Trail or, uh, I-95, but we recommend Dixie Highway because of its kitschy signs and architectural oddities. How this mishmash of businesses operates on Dixie is one of the wonders of this street, where quirky names abound — The Mad Hatter Lounge, the Tanks A Lot aquarium shop. Enjoy the broad range of commercial enterprises — ethnic restaurants and grocers, car repair shops, upscale antique stores, churches, funeral homes, an ice cream factory, dive bars, tattered remnants of Florida’s once-vibrant motor court culture and even Lake Worth City Hall (which once doubled as a movie set in the film “Body Heat.”)
Exterior of The Palm Beach Post building. (Riuchard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)
Exterior of The Palm Beach Post building. (Riuchard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)

3 sights to see:

1. The tour begins by going south on Dixie at The Palm Beach Post building (say Hi to us!) Immediately on your left is the first quirky sign you need to Instagram: the giant hammer on top of Hall Hardware (2750 S. Dixie), where Martha Stewart visited recently. More sweet sights in West Palm: the Howley’s restaurant logo sign at 4700 S. Dixie (“Cooked In Sight, Must Be Right”), and the double sky-high ice cream cones at Carvel (5901 S. Dixie).

Old Key Lime House in Lantana. (Bruce R. Bennett/The Palm Beach Post)
Old Key Lime House in Lantana. (Bruce R. Bennett/The Palm Beach Post)

2. Once you cross the line into Lake Worth, check out the crinkled pie-crust shaped lettering on The Upper Crust pie shop (2015 N. Dixie, Lake Worth), the pithy, pungent sayings on the Harry’s Banana Farm bar sign (1919 N. Dixie), the art deco, birthday cake-like curves of Blue Front BBQ (1132 N. Dixie), the cool jazz mural on the side of Chafin Music (608 N. Dixie), the big fish on top of Tuppen’s Marine and Tackle (1002 N. Dixie), and, of course, the big horse sitting on top of McLelland’s Inc. Saddlery (317 N. Dixie).

3. In Lantana, see the cute, old-school Barefoot Mailman Motel (138 S. Dixie in Lantana). And end your tour with a short jaunt east down Ocean Avenue in Lantana to behold the blindingly green exterior of the Old Key Lime House (300 E. Ocean Ave.)— it’s the perfect only-in-Florida end point to your funky drive.
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ROAD TRIP NO. 6: Jupiter Lighthouse to Jupiter Island

Length: 30 miles
Start/Stop: Begin at Indiantown Road and South Beach Road, Jupiter. Head east over the Intracoastal bridge, then veer north past Coral Cove Park and into Martin County. Once you pass through Jupiter Island, turn left/west at Bridge Road in Hobe Sound, then left/south on U.S. 1 back to Palm Beach County.
Areas around (and under) the beach access ramp, and in the dunes, at Coral Cove Park.
Areas around (and under) the beach access ramp, and in the dunes, at Coral Cove Park.
Why this drive delights: Jupiter Island and its endless enclaves of the wealthy is the north version of Palm Beach. You won’t see much, because of the towering landscaping, but that landscaping is divine, the drive is blissful and you can play a game of counting how many “Service Entrance” signs you spot. (Lots of bicyclists through here, so drive carefully.)

5 sights to see:

Large wave crashes on shore at Blowing Rocks Preserve. (Palm Beach Post file photo)
Large wave crashes on shore at Blowing Rocks Preserve. (Palm Beach Post file photo)

 

1. If you’ve never been to the 73-acre Blowing Rocks Preserve (574 South Beach Road), run by the Nature Conservancy, it’s worth a stop, especially if the water is spuming through the limestone rocks on the beach. It’s our mini-Big Sur.
2. On Jupiter Island, stay right on South Beach Road when it forks and make a quick stop at Christ Memorial Chapel (52 S. Beach Road), a Spanish-style church built in 1939. (Where else will you see a church that opens onto a broad golf course fairway?)
Ficus Nitida is the species of trees lining bridge road on Jupiter Island. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)
Ficus Nitida is the species of trees lining bridge road on Jupiter Island. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)
3. When you reach South Beach Road and Estrada Drive, take a left and wind down a beautiful street of pretty houses that terminates at the Jupiter Island Club, 1 Estrada, with its gorgeous club building, manicured lawns and yacht dock. (And you’re not a member, so keep on driving.)
4. Back on South Beach Road, head past the Bridge Road intersection and go all the way to the terminus at the Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge. Check out the mountainous, perfectly sculpted dune/mound that separates the road from the beach.
5. Once you get to Bridge Road and U.S 1, turn south on U.S. 1 and take the semi-hilly drive back to Palm Beach County, past sparkling glimpses of the Intracoastal and more dunes at Jonathan Dickinson State Park (16450 SE Federal Highway). Bonus points if you can spot the nearby gated driveway to a certain Palm Beach County-bred movie star’s house.

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ROAD TRIP NO. 7: Central/North end of Palm Beach

Length: 12 miles
Start/Stop: Head north on Cocoanut Row at Royal Palm Way, past the Society of Four Arts and the Flagler Museum, across Royal Poinciana Way and down Bradley Place as it turns into North Lake Way. Turn left onto Country Club Road and head all the way up north past the Sailfish Club, then scoot over to North Ocean Boulevard and head south, as it turns into South County Road. End at Phipps Plaza and South County Road.
The coral cut on Country Club Road is on the west side of Palm Beach. (Meghan McCarthy/The Palm Beach Post)
The coral cut on Country Club Road is on the west side of Palm Beach. (Meghan McCarthy/The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: Hey, pretty much all of Palm Beach is a scenic getaway, and who doesn’t like to look at places you’ll never live? You can see a mix of eye-catching homes draped in towering landscaping (celebs like Rush Limbaugh and Howard Stern have abodes in the north end) and the tight roads are fun to drive.
5 sights to see:
1. When you turn onto Country Club Road from North Lake Way, behold one of the island’s most dazzling natural wonders: the deep coral cut that towers above both sides of the road (don’t forget to look for the Bastille-like prison window in the cut, which has prompted all sorts of urban legends, but is really just a water department door.). Coming out of the cut, you get a dazzling view of the Intracoastal along the Lake Trail (which you should walk or bike at some point) and the mega-yachts parked at boat yards on the West Palm side.
Susan and Chris Cristopoulos take a rest Thursday afternoon during their bike ride along the Lake Trail near the Palm Beach Country Club. (Palm Beach Post file photo)
Susan and Chris Cristopoulos take a rest Thursday afternoon during their bike ride along the Lake Trail near the Palm Beach Country Club. (Palm Beach Post file photo)
2. Once you get to Arabian Road, curve left as it becomes Indian Road, then jog north on N. Ocean Boulevard to check out the northernmost point of the island and the short dock, where you can see cruise ships heading out to the Atlantic.
3. Heading back south on N. Ocean, enjoy more winding curves, glimpses of Atlantic (especially around the Palm Beach Country Club) and keep up with the construction teardowns and buildups that always seem to be happening on the north end.
The Breakers.
The Breakers.
4. The leisurely drive continues south past a shady canopy of trees between Phipps Estate Road and Sanford Avenue, and such local sights as Green’s Pharmacy, St. Edward’s Church, the old Paramount Theater complex, The Breakers and Bethesda-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church, all worth a visit.
5. End your trip on one of our favorite pocket roads by turning right off S. County Road into Phipps Plaza, a cute little roundabout of architectural offices and tucked-away homes and no parking spots for the hoi-polloi. This is Palm Beach, after all.

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ROAD TRIP NO. 8: Wellington

Length: 8 miles
Start/stop: Turn off Southern Boulevard onto Bink’s Forest Drive, and drive up to Aero Club Drive. Take a right there and head down to Greenbrier Shores Boulevard, where you can turn right into the Aero Club neighborhood.
An airplane parked in the Aero Club in Wellington. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)
An airplane parked in the Aero Club in Wellington. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)

 

Why this drive delights: It’s not every housing development that boasts airplane hangar garages, and it’s unusual to see planes parked as casually as Cadillacs in back yards. And don’t forget to check out the fun street names — Boing Street, Lindbergh Lane, Take Off Place, etc.
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ROAD TRIP NO. 9: Lake Osborne to High Ridge Road

Length: 6.5 miles
Start/Stop: Turn off Lake Worth Road onto Lake Osborne Drive. Once you reach Lantana Road, double back and turn right on High Ridge Road, ending at Hypoluxo Road.
Lake Osborne Park on the west side of High Ridge Road, south of Lantana Road. (Thomas Cordy/The Palm Beach Post)
Lake Osborne Park on the west side of High Ridge Road, south of Lantana Road. (Thomas Cordy/The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: This is a scenic waterfront drive that reminds you of Old Florida. Revel in a leisurely, miles-long ride around the other big Lake O in the county.
 2 sights to see:
1. On Lake Osborne Drive, past the entrance to John Prince Park, there are plenty of spots to pull your car over and watch fishermen on the lake, or join the sidewalk parade. The apartment complexes and houses aren’t your usual waterfront property — they’re older, more middle-class, not Mega-Mansion land, as though somehow developers were not given the secret password to come here, tear down and overbuild. (And this quiet, neighborhood feel is what some people are worried about losing if the Atlanta Braves build a spring training complex at John Prince.)
John Prince Park.
John Prince Park.
2. High Ridge Road is a sweet, short, semi-hilly drive (hence the name.) Just past High Ridge and Hypoluxo Road, visit the High Ridge Natural Scrub Area (7300 High Ridge Rd.), another pocket nature preserve where you can stretch your legs and end your journey.
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Five furious bike trails in Palm Beach County

It’s hard to believe it, but you can actually go mountain biking in Florida (sort of)! Sure, we have plenty of nicely paved bike paths around the wealthy properties in Palm Beach County, but if you’re looking for a bit more adrenaline, you better check out these trails:

Daryll McKenzie, heads down the hill with riders behind him during the Sandblaster Mountain Bike Race Series at Dyer Park. (Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)
Daryll McKenzie, heads down the hill with riders behind him during the Sandblaster Mountain Bike Race Series at Dyer Park. (Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)

Dyer Park’s “The Hill” in West Palm Beach: This climbing/descending trail is over 53 feet in elevation! Sounds crazy, right? An actual hill in Florida where you can bike and test your endurance. The bike path is made out of crushed shell rock and is approximately 2.4 miles long and about 2 feet wide. Even though you will ride through native forests, most of the trail is exposed to the sun, so wear appropriate clothing and apply sunblock.

When: Everyday, sunrise to sunset.
Where: 7301 Haverhill Road West Palm Beach, Florida 33412
Cost: Free
Contact: (561) 966-6600pbcparks@pbcgov.org

Check out part of the trail captured by this GoPro camera:

. The Dyer Perimeter in West Palm Beach: Most use this 4.7-mile bike trail as a conditioning activity before facing “The Hill” at Dyer Park. “The way is mostly smooth, so beginners won’t have any problems,” according to Rei’s MTB Project. It’s not a boring trail, though. According to the MTB project, it has several miles of twisty single-track trails in the woods that loop around the park. So why would you need a mountain bike? There are broken branches and trunks you’ll want to bike over.

When: Everyday, sunrise to sunset.
Where: 7301 Haverhill Road West Palm Beach, Florida 33412
Cost: Free
Contact:(561) 966-6600pbcparks@pbcgov.org.

Pinehurst MTB Trail in Greenacres: Get technical and use all of your mountain bike’s gears. This trail is not as high in elevation as the Dyer Park trail, nor as fast as the Dyer Perimeter. On this one, you’ll get to sharpen your skills by controlling your balance, going over obstacles and shifting gears constantly. Get ready for plenty of log piles, sharp turns and sudden drops. It’s a good, quick workout packed into 4 miles according to Rei’s MTB project.

When: Everyday, sunrise to sunset.
Where: 2400 Pinehurst Dr, Greenacres, FL 33413
Cost: Free
Contact: (561) 966-6600pbcparks@pbcgov.org

Note: There is no parking on the actual trail, but there are two parks nearby with plenty of parking, restrooms, water, and pavilions: Okeeheelee Park and Greenacres Freedom Park.

4. West Delray Trail in Delray Beach: If you’re more into scenery and wildlife, this one is for you. This trail is a really pretty ride through canopied tropics, lakes, and swamp land inside West Delray Regional Park. It’s also fun because it has many technical elements such as turns, rocks, mounds and tree branches. 

There is a variety of wildlife  including squirrels, birds, butterflies, and lots of bugs as well, so wear repellent.

When: Everyday, sunrise to sunset.
Where: 10875 W Atlantic Ave, Delray Beach, FL 33446
Cost: Free
Contact: (561) 966-6600. pbcparks@pbcgov.org

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Habitat restoration work and trail improvement continues in Cypress Creek South, a new county natural area and preserve in Jupiter. (Thomas Cordy / The Palm Beach Post)
  1. Cypress Creek Natural Area in Jupiter: Shell rock road through the Cypress Creek Natural Area. There are a few boardwalks that overlook the natural area and splinter trails for “foot traffic only.” The trail goes 2 miles west and ends at Mack Dairy Rd. http://www.singletracks.com/bike-trails/cypress-creek-natural

No need to crack your piggy bank to attend this music festival

Music festivals are always a blast, especially when you get to hear your favorite jams, remixes or original songs while having your arms around your buddies (or special someone) and signing along. However, while some music spectacles can be very pricey, this upcoming one up is not! Head over to the free “Damn Glad to Party with You” music festival this Saturday, Oct. 15 at CSW Bar + Kitchen in Lake Worth.

Kai Schneider, left, and Remy Max hold each other while waiting for Skrillex to perform during the third day of the Okeechobee Music Festival in Okeechobee, Florida on Saturday, March 5, 2016. (Daniel Owen / The Palm Beach Post)
Kai Schneider, left, and Remy Max hold each other while waiting for Skrillex to perform during the third day of the Okeechobee Music Festival in Okeechobee, Florida on Saturday, March 5, 2016. (Daniel Owen / The Palm Beach Post)

Related: 7 music concerts you must see this fall

The event’s Facebook page already shows more than 45 people are attending!

The Avett Brothers perform to a packed crowd on the final night of the Okeechobee Music Festival in Okeechobee, Florida on Sunday, March 6, 2016. (Daniel Owen / The Palm Beach Post)
The Avett Brothers perform to a packed crowd on the final night of the Okeechobee Music Festival in Okeechobee, Florida on Sunday, March 6, 2016. (Daniel Owen / The Palm Beach Post)

If great music, a fantastic Indie craft bazaar and unique beers can’t get you through 12 hours of partying from 2 p.m. to 2 a.m, then there’s seriously something wrong with you. I’m only kidding, but really, this event has plenty of fun to get you going.

Kent LawlerCheck and DJ’s Layne Fox will set the mood throughout this event, by performing between live performances. The live music line up is here:

Bobby Lee Rogers Trio

Crazy Fingers

Victoria Cardona

Chloe Dolandis

Solemark

 

 

The Deets:
What: “Damn Glad To Party With You” Music Festival
When: 2 p.m. to 2 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 15
Where: CWS Bar + Kitchen. 522 Lucerne Ave., Lake Worth
Cost: Free Cover. Take cash for drinks and food.
Contact: www.cswlw.com or call (561)318-5637. #damngladtomeetyou

Lighten up your life with these events in Jupiter!

As if the Jupiter Lighthouse isn’t enough to put a smile on your face, this iconic 1860 structure is hosting several activities and programs for adults and the entire family.

“Our award-winning staff and volunteers provide tours, visitor services, programming and educational experiences to over 75,000 annual visitors,”according to The Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse website.

See for yourself, why so many tourists visit this beauty by checking out our gallery and by attending following events:

TWILIGHT YOGA AT THE LIGHT

Floor mat, check.
Water bottle, check.
Flashlight, check.
Elasticity…. Don’t worry, this is an all-level yoga class! Beginners encouraged.

Submitted by Mike Morrill
Submitted by Mike Morrill

Relax and enjoy a yoga experience on the lighthouse deck at sunset and resuming once it’s dark out.

When: Every Monday: 6 to 7 p.m.
Oct. 17, 24 and 31.
Nov. 7, 14, 21 and 28.
Dec. 5, 12, 19 and 26.

Where: Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum, 500 Captain Armour’s Way, Jupiter

Cost: Donation.

Contact: 561-747-8380 X101. or visit the Jupiter Lighthouse website.

Note: Meet at the museum 10 minutes prior to start time, the class is weather dependent, please check the website for updates and future start times.

LIGHTHOUSE SUNSET TOUR

This tower reaches a height of 105 feet above the water, and you get to climb as you learn its history. Once you’ve made it to the top, you’ll reward yourself with beautiful sunsets from this amazing landmark. Bring your camera!

Submitted by Christopher Lopez I've been doing night security at Utiki Beach for nearly 2 years now and there really isn't much to photograph that doesn't in some way have the lighthouse involved. I took this photograph a couple weeks ago and the lightning flashed perfectly. I used a Canon 7D MarkII with a 50mm lens on a tripod. 20 second exposure at f/7.1 ISO 100. I have tons of varying pictures of the light house involving anything from lightning to sunrises.
Submitted by Christopher Lopez

Sunday, August 7, is National Lighthouse Day. The Jupiter Lighthouse celebrated with special admission fees. Visitors from Russia, Italy, Mexico and Argentina were among the approximately 263 visitors climbing the 105 steps to the top of lighthouse on Sunday. Kelly Foote, visiting from Holland Patent, New York is helped down the steps by her 5 year old daughter Corinne. "I was a little scared," said Foote, "I had to conquer my fear of heights." (Melanie Bell / The Palm Beach Post)
The Jupiter Lighthouse. (Melanie Bell / The Palm Beach Post)

Opens: Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016, beginning with an inside look at the nuts & bolts of a working lighthouse watch room. The tours are 75 minutes long.

WhenOct. 19, Nov. 2 & 30, and Dec. 14 & 28.  6 to7:15 pm.

Where: Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum. 500 Captain Armour’s Way, Jupiter

Cost: $15 Members, $20 non-members. RSVP required.

Contact: 561-747-8380 X101 or visit the Jupiter Lighthouse website.

Note: Children must be at least 48” tall to climb the tower.

LIGHTHOUSE STORY TIME & CRAFTS FOR KIDS

Hey parents: It’s picnic time for you and the little ones! This 45-minute program includes craft activities and story time about the Lighthouse Keepers, Florida history, people, local plants and animals. Bring your sandwiches, floor mat and juice boxes to start your day under the Lighthouse Seminole Chickee Hut. Oh, and don’t forget your kids.

He's got the lighthouse in his hands! Kevin Brown, 14, of Jupiter, was waiting in the parking lot of the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum, waiting for the rest of the Boy Scouts from Troop 132 of Palm Beach Gardens to arrive for the lighthouse tour. He got creative for dad Mitchell Brown's camera. Contributed
Kevin Brown of Jupiter. (Contributed)

When: Nov 1, Dec 6. 10:30 to 11:15 a.m.

WhereJupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum, 500 Captain Armour’s Way, Jupiter

Cost: Free Program, RSVP required Friday before the program date.

Contact: 561-747-8380 X101 or visit the Jupiter Lighthouse website

Note:  Ideal for kids ages 8 and under.

HIKE THROUGH HISTORY

Put on your hiking gear, pack lots of water and splash some sunscreen. Get on your best Indiana Jones attitude and get ready to discover the topography and natural history of Jupiter’s 120-acre conservation lands. This two-mile excursion passes through several historic points around the lighthouse.

Glenn Salts III was raised in Jupiter and now lives in Palm Beach Gardens. He's had the Jupiter Lighthouse tattoo on his back for five years. Why? "It's one of my favorite places in the world!" Contributed
Glenn Salts III was raised in Jupiter and now lives in Palm Beach Gardens. He’s had the Jupiter Lighthouse tattoo on his back for five years. Why? “It’s one of my favorite places in the world!” (Contributed)

When: Nov 5, Dec 3. 8:30 to 10:30 a.m.

Where: 500 Captain Armour’s Way, Jupiter. The hike departs from the flag pole at the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum.

Cost: Admission is free but space is limited; rsvp required.

Contact: 561-747-8380 X101 or visit the Jupiter Lighthouse website.

Note: The minimum age for children is 5.  Ages 13 & under must be accompanied by an adult who is at least 18 years old.

LIGHTHOUSE MOONRISE TOUR

Sunrises and sunsets always get the credit, yet moonrises are just as amazing. We’re lucky to live by the east coast because we can see the moon rising from the Atlantic! Sometimes the moon puts on a bright silver costume but when she’s feeling frisky, she turns bright red.

Submitted by Jeffrey Bundonis-Tequesta,Fl. April 2016 full moon rise taken from the north side of the bridge.
April 2016 full moon rise taken from the north side of the bridge. (Submitted by Jeffrey Bundonis-Tequesta)

When:  Nov. 14, and Dec. 13. 4:45 to 6:00 p.m.

Where: Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum. 500 Captain Armour’s Way, Jupiter

Cost: $15 Members, $20 non-members, rsvp required.

Contact:  561-747-8380 X101 or visit the Jupiter Lighthouse website.

Note: Children must be at least 48” tall to climb the tower.

Lighthouse River Rendezvous

This is the Cadillac of all of these events. A must-attend social gathering that celebrates the history of the iconic Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and its photographers who have captured the landmark at its very best.

Submitted by J Michael Carlisle, Tequesta, Florida This photograph was taken at dawn from the soccer field adjacent to the Jupiter Lighthouse during the holiday season (notice the decoration around the top of the lighthouse) . I used a Nikon D300 camera. The exposure was 1 sec at f5.6 with a Nikkor 70-200mm f2.8 lens. Editing was done with Photoshop. This was the best of approximately 300 exposures.
“This photograph was taken at dawn from the soccer field adjacent to the Jupiter Lighthouse during the holiday season.” (Submitted by J Michael Carlisle, Tequesta)

Enjoy a live music, hors d’oeuvres from Jupiter’s top restaurants, choose among fine beers and wines and participate in the magical silent auction. You’ll take home a limited edition 2017 Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse Calendar and meet and greet the photographers of social media who made it possible.

When: Nov, 19, 2016, 6 to 9:00 p.m.

WhereJupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum. 500 Captain Armour’s Way, Jupiter

Cost: Limited tickets: $75 per person

Contact:  Call 561-747-8380 x101 for tickets.

Note:  All tickets are non-refundable. Each ticket will include a copy of the 2017 Lighthouse Photography Calendar being launched at the event.

Best Halloween events, parties come to town

The boys and ghouls of Fright Nights are in full swing! The annual spookfest, at the South Florida Fairgrounds, is open to scare the heck out of you from now until Oct. 29.

Also: Best Halloween events, parties in Palm Beach County

photo fright nights
People get spooked in the haunted houses during Fright Nights at the South Florida Fairgrounds in West Palm Beach. (Richard Graulich/The Palm Beach Post)

There are four new haunted houses this year at Fright Nights: The Void; Sunnyville Schoolhouse; Doll Factory and Pestilence. If  you need a break from the haunted houses, check out the midway rides, games, carnival food and scare zone.

For more information, visit the Fright Nights website, or call 561-793-0333.

The Mystery of Love and Sex: If the title’s not enough to make you see this show, we don’t know what is.

Bring your own, well, anything to the Stuart & Shelby Theater at Arts Garage this month where you will laugh at scenes from The Mystery of Love and Sex, a romantic comedy about sexual and emotional protocol according to two couples.

By BYOA, they really do mean, ANYTHING: you own alcohol, food, cutlery, cups, the whole nine.

The play is inviting to the young and old with characters like Charlotte, a Jewish college student who falls in love with her childhood best friend, Johnny, a black man. And Charlotte’s traditional parents, who scramble to keep up as their daughter’s sexual desires begin to complicate their own relationship.

We haven’t seen the show yet but have a feeling it’ll be compelling to watch an interracial couple open up about their sex lives to a parochial set of parents who realize they may need to revisit the fundamentals of their own relationship and sex life.

In fact, the New York Times called it “a perfectly wonderful new play…a tender and funny exploration of the lives of two couples from two generations….like a chart depicting the sexual and emotional anatomy of us all.”

General admission tickets will cost you $30, but you can save $5 on a preview showing on Wednesday, Oct. 12 at 7:30 p.m. If you decide to bring your own booze, wine or food, you can purchase reserved or premium table seating for $40 or $45. (Don’t forget cutlery!) 

Get tickets and list of show times here. 


The Deets:

What: The Mystery of Love and Sex

When: Opening night is October 13th and runs through October 30th.

Where: The Stuart and Shelby Theater at Arts Garage, Delray Beach

Cost: $30 for general admission

One, Two, Drink up! Don’t miss the Hilton’s Oktoberfest Sunday

We may not be crunching leaves or catching a chill in South Florida, but fall is here and that means the pumpkin picking, football watching and school shopping is in full effect. It means we can also look forward to Oktoberfest, which happens all over the world during this time, every year.

On Sunday, October 16th, you can enjoy an evening of beer tasting, dining, lawn games and live music at the Hilton in West Palm Beach.

The 42nd Annual American-German Club Oktoberfest in Lake Worth, Florida on October 10, 2015. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
The 42nd Annual American-German Club Oktoberfest in Lake Worth, Florida on October 10, 2015. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

Yes, there will be lots of beer, but it’s still a family-friendly event and everyone gets free access. However, if you want to celebrate Oktoberfest in true style, you can register and pay $30 for unlimited beer tasting from Funky Buddha, Due South, Twisted Trunk and Inlet Brewery. 

As for food, you can look forward to a variety of bratwurst served with grilled peppers and onions on a hoagie bun. And of course there will be potato salad and creamy sauerkraut. The kids will love Munich’s giant pretzel — just hold the beer cheese and beer mustard for yourself.

(Bill Ingram/Palm Beach Post): Boynton Beach: Due South Brewing Company sampler Tuesday in Boynton Beach.
Due South Brewing Company sampler Tuesday in Boynton Beach. (Bill Ingram/Palm Beach Post)

The Deets:Oktoberfest at The Hilton West Palm Beach

What: Oktoberfest

When: October 16, 2016 from 3:00 p.m. until 7:00 p.m.

Where: Hilton West Palm Beach, 600 Okeechobee Boulevard, West Palm Beach

Cost: FREE and $30 if you want unlimited beer tastings

 

Got a thing for monsters? This West Palm art show is for you.

Monster Madness, a haunted art show where the dead and the living collide opens on Saturday, October 15 in West Palm Beach at Slushbox Gallery.

As the SlushBox Gallery story says on Facebook: “You can be sure to find the best Lowbrow and Outsider art in Florida and around the country” in this very cool space behind Ink & Pistons Tattoo shop (one of West Palm’s best kept secrets, for sure)
Related: Best spooktacular Halloween events in Palm Beach County

Be freaked out, in awe or maybe a little bit of both because the featured artists are super talented. Here’s a taste of what you’ll see:

This freaky little beauty right here…

 

And this gator of guy too.

 

This group art exhibit at SlushBox Gallery features as many as 25 different artists. See which of your friends are already going by visiting the Facebook event. Oh, and follow the gallery on Instagram for more sneak peeks, and shoot, just to spice up your Instagram feed.

Want to get ideas for Halloween costumes? Check out these creepy makeup tutorials on YouTube.

It’s that time of the year again, where the dead crawl back to life and the living yearn to cross to the other side. Enjoy!


The Deets:

What: Monster Madness

When: Opening night Saturday, October 15. Shows until November 19

Where: SlushBox Gallery 2716 South Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach, FL 33405

Contact: 561-832-4655