Missed Diner En Blanc? Attend this lavish, pop-up feast instead

It’s time for another extravagant bash! Join Dreyfoos in White, a pop-up picnic-style festivity where hundreds of people dress in all-white and feast at a secret location in the city.

Among ritzy themed-centerpieces and tablecapes, everyone enjoys plenty of food and drinks with their peeps. Don’t be fooled by the magic and exclusivity of the night. This party gets turnt up! And unlike Diner En Blanc, it’s for a good cause, too.

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Here are 9 things to know about Dreyfoos in White.

All-white attire

This is not an option. Be as chic with your white garments as possible and host your own al-fresco get-together. Have fun with it. Hats, scarves, gowns and crowns totally expected. This is a made-for-Instagram event.

It’s exclusive

The secret location will be revealed just one hour before the event. Buy your ticket now and wait patiently for the invitation via e-mail.  This just adds more suspense to the event and keeps large crowds away from your spree.

Over the top!

Dreyfoos in White. (Margie Yansura/ Wordsmith Communications)
Dreyfoos in White. (Margie Yansura/ Wordsmith Communications)

Bring your most creative decorations to the table —literally. The event is based on showing off your most extravagant table-espace and creativity. Make an iconic table WITH A THEME and enter different decor competitions. You’ll also need them in order to eat and drink.

Stand out

Party-goers will be competing for “Most Fabulous,” “Most Humorous” and “Judges’ Choice” awards based on the dedication and great taste of their center pieces. The crowd and celebrity judges will be comparing the best of the best.

Bon Appétit

You have two options for your picnic:

  1. Order your food prior to the night through SandyJames Fine Food, pick it up at the event and take it to your table.
  2. Bring your own indulgences, and serve and pour on your finest China to enjoy.

Get lit!

Dreyfoos in White. (Margie Yansura/ Wordsmith Communications)
Dreyfoos in White. (Margie Yansura/ Wordsmith Communications)

The Dreyfoos string and jazz students will provide music throughout the night, and there will even be a flash mob by dance students. And make sure you don’t miss the sparklers. These will light up the night before everyone starts dancing to the music of DJ Brad Barfield.

What not to Bring

Don’t arrive in a U-haul with tables and chairs. The Dreyfoos School of the Arts Foundation will provide these along with sparklers and white cloth napkins for the traditional “napkin twirl,” which kicks off the celebration. Just worry about what goes on the top of your table: decorations, food and drinks.

The Purpose

Funds raised through Dreyfoos in White help support vital educational programs that would otherwise not be funded. Last year, the Dreyfoos School of the Arts Foundation provided $1.3 million in support to the School of the Arts.

Dreyfoos in White. (Margie Yansura/ Wordsmith Communications)
Dreyfoos in White. (Margie Yansura/ Wordsmith Communications)
Still not convinced that this event is can’t-miss? These photos from last year’s party should do the trick.

The Details:
What: Dreyfoos in White

When: Saturday, November 12, 2016, 5:00 p.m.10:00 p.m.
Where: *Secret Location will be revealed by e-mail after purchasing tickets
Tickets: Click here to purchase.

Battle of the Sexes: Who won the Thrift Shop Challenge?

The Palm Beach Post introduces a new, monthly series: “Battle of the Sexes.”

Reporters Julio Poletti and Corvaya Jeffries of The Palm Beach Post will compete against each other in monthly challenges. The fun part? Community members like you will help decide the challenges.

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To get the ball rollin’, Julio and Corvaya have already finished their first battle, and it’s up to you to decide who won.


Fall in Love with Thrifting

Fall can be pretty much of a joke for most Floridians.

 

Beyond some lightweight sweaters and scarves, the beach is still in our backyard, the days are still sunny and #FallinFlorida remains a destination for most of the country.

Related: Best scenic drives in Palm Beach County

Still, the temps drop, wardrobes change and themed-festivities such as pumpkin carvings and Halloween parties go down.

For this reason, the first Battle of the Sexes challenge is to help you, and us, be ready for cool breezes and hot cocoa sippin’ on patios.

The Challenge

Build an entire fall outfit from a local thrift shop, which could be worn to any upcoming celebration.

Related: Best thrift shops in Palm Beach County

The Rules 

 

Yes they are, Regina!

Watch the Competition before voting

How to judge

  • Is this a fall outfit?
  • Does it fit?
  • Is it stylish?
  • Is it a complete look?

Vote for the winner!

 

Decide who followed the rules and write ONLY the name of your pick in the comment section of the Facebook Post or take the poll below.

Pitch a challenge

What do you think Julio and Corvaya should compete in next? Leave a comment on the story or on Facebook. Or, just vote for a battle that we’ve already brainstormed.

Now that the challenge is over, enjoy a Thrift Shop-inspired jam that topped the Billboard charts for four weeks in 2013. Can’t see the video? Click here.

Photos: Who was the Witch of Wellington? The answer with amazing photos

Suzan Strauss was known as the Lava Lady in Los Angeles in the 1990's, where she let photographer Osker Jimenez capture her in her DIY couture. (Osker Jimenez Exposure House)
Suzan Strauss on a street near her Los Angeles home in the 1990’s. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
In Wellington, Strauss was a regular at local thrift stores. (Lourdes Cabrera)
In Wellington, Strauss was a regular at Wellington thrift stores. (Lourdes Cabrera)

In Florida’s suffocating heat, she wore head-to-toe black, as if in mourning a loss.

Consequently, locals dubbed her the Witch of Wellington.

Read the full story about this eccentric Wellington and Los Angeles icon

But in Los Angeles in the 1980’s and ’90’s, Suzan Strauss was a street style star for the colorful outfits she designed, always worn with platform boots as high as horses’ hooves and a towering hat covering her hair.

The effect, said photographer Osker Jimenez, was to make her look seven feet tall as she glided slowly along Melrose Avenue in West Hollywood, among the era’s pierced punks, dark goths and glam rock kids.

Fascinated with this self-assured, eccentrically-dressed woman, Jimenez photographed her for a decade, eventually publishing two books and staging a photo exhibition of his Strauss photos.

Photographer Osker Jimenez had an art gallery show of his photos of Strauss superimposed against stark landscapers. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
Photographer Osker Jimenez had an art gallery show of his photos of Strauss superimposed against stark landscapes. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)

 

The Lava Lady waters her garden from the lava rock wall surrounding her Los Angeles home. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
The Lava Lady waters her garden from the lava rock wall surrounding her Los Angeles home. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)

 

 

Strauss' Wellington home, where she constructed semi-circular courtyards at each end of the house, which was decorated with a row of upside down flower pots. (Post photo/Barbara Marshall)
Strauss’ Wellington home, where she constructed semi-circular courtyards at each end of the house, which was decorated with a row of upside down flower pots. (Post photo/Barbara Marshall)

 

(Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
(Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
(Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
Strauss was born to an Orthodox Jewish family. In accordance with custom, she always wore hats or wigs to cover her hair. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
In Los Angeles, she carefully cultivated the garden surrounding her home. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
In Los Angeles, she carefully cultivated the garden surrounding the lava rock-covered home that gave her the name “Lava Lady.” (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
Another of Jimenez' photos of Strauss, superimposed on a background of fireworks. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
Another of Jimenez’ photos of Strauss, superimposed on a background of fireworks. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)