Party hard! 2017 Oktoberfest of The Palm Beaches is here

“Prost!” That’s “cheers!” in German, and the only German word you need to know at this year’s 44th annual Oktoberfest at the American-German Club in Lake Worth starting Friday,  Oct. 13. Submerge yourself in the German culture by enjoying two weekends of family fun, with authentic German meals, live music, entertainment, arts and crafts for the kids and of course, more beer! Oktoberfest of the Palm Beaches is held the second and third weekends in October every year, rain or shine.

Cutline info: 1. A bone-dry pup quenches his thirst at Tampa Convention Center s Sail Pavilion./Photo provided 2. Festival-goers take part in a costume contest at Oktoberfest on Perdido Key./photo provided 3. Trick-or-treating at SeaWorld in Orlando./Photo provided 4. Splash in the Hoyt House pool or venture inside for the 51 Shades of Gray special./Photo provided 5. The Hyatt Regency Clearwater Beach Resort and Spa hired Chef Cary Roy as sous chef./Photo provided
Festival-goers take part in a costume contest at Oktoberfest on Perdido Key. (the Palm Beach Post).

The celebration will kick off with several ceremonies such as a flag parade and a German beer keg tapping. The Heldensteiner band is back straight from Munich at Oktoberfest of the Palm Beaches. Get ready to drink, eat, and dance your butt off in your best German attire. Keep your eyes open and congratulate the winner of Miss Oktoberfest 2017. For event updates, click here.

Don’t believe the fun you’re missing? Check out this video from a previous celebration.

What: The 44th Annual Oktoberfest

When: October 13, 14, 15 and October 20, 21, 22.

Hours: Fridays, 5 to 11 p.m.; Saturdays, noon to 11 p.m.; Sundays, noon to 8 p.m.

Where: 5111 Lantana Road, Lake Worth, FL 33463

Cost:  Adults $10, Children under 13 with paying adult, admitted Free. Free admission on Sundays to active Military personnel, veterans and first responders with ID. Buy tickets here.

Contact: Phone: 561-967-6464

This Lake Worth woman is one of Playboy magazine’s first centerfolds

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She’s been a catalog model, cigarette girl, Vegas cocktail waitress, New York theater actress and bit part player in an Oscar-winning movie.

But it was one photo session in the early 1950s that sealed Neva Gilbert’s claim to pop culture fame. The Lake Worth resident was one of Playboy magazine’s earliest centerfolds, Miss July 1954, a beautiful, long-legged blonde posed alluringly across a tiger skin rug.

“I’m the oldest living Playboy Playmate,” she proudly tells people.

But is she?

Find out, and see more photos of Gilbert then and now, in our story:

THE CENTERFOLD NEXT DOOR

 

Photos, video: Watch the Norton Museum of Art get demolished

There’s quite an exhibit going on this month at the Norton Museum, but it’s not all inside the art institution.

Travel down South Dixie Highway in West Palm Beach and you can watch construction crews tearing great hunks out of the museum: the first step to preparing for its $100 million expansion and renovation, scheduled to be completed two years from now in December 2018.

A bulldozer guts part of the Norton on its Dixie Highway side. (Photos by Larry Aydlette/The Palm Beach Post)
A bulldozer guts part of the Norton on its Dixie Highway side. (Photos by Larry Aydlette/The Palm Beach Post)

According to Norton spokesman Scott Benarde, these areas of the museum are being demolished: the inner atrium and stairs, the Harris Pavilion (former home of the Chihuly glass ceiling), the Great Hall entranceway, the cafe, and classroom and boardroom space.

Areas being gutted for renovation include the three-story Nessel Wing, the theater, great hall and museum gift shop.

 

Construction work continues near the former entrance of the museum.
Construction work continues near the former entrance of the museum.

Demolition should be completed by late December, Benarde said. In the meantime, admission continues to be free to the museum. And, despite the construction inconvenience, there is still a lot to see there, especially the Question Bridge video exhibit and the Rudin Prize photography show.

While many favorite paintings remain in storage, there are still plenty of famous names on the wall, inclusing Picasso, Matisse, O’Keeefe and Hopper.

A worker walks through the construction zone on the Dixie Highway side of the museum.
A worker walks through the construction zone on the Dixie Highway side of the museum.

 

A view from the Jefferson Avenue side of the museum.
A view from the Jefferson Avenue side of the museum.

 

The new Olive Avenue entrance, which is the old entrance when it was known as The Norton Gallery.
The new Olive Avenue entrance, which is the old entrance when it was known as The Norton Gallery.

 

The inner courtyard is still a sun-dappled oasis from the construction chaos.
The inner courtyard is still a sun-dappled oasis from the construction chaos.

 

Sign of the times: The museum is open with free admission, but you've got to take a long walk from the parking lot or use the free shuttle service.
Sign of the times: The museum is open with free admission, but you’ve got to take a long walk from the parking lot or use the free shuttle service.

 

Bonfire in Lake Worth this Friday!

There’s something about sitting next to a fire that just sets a chillaxing mood. Ge ready to experience the beach’s breeze, the smell of burning wood and the scent of a special someone by attending the next Lake Worth Bon Fire, Friday, November 25th at 6 p.m.

Cool nights are just starting to sweep through South Florida, so start packing your s’mores and comfy blankets. It’s about to get hot in here.-literally. The bonfires are hosted by the city of Lake Worth right on the beach across from the Lake Worth Casino Building and Beach Complex.

As if the flames, the cuddling and the cool nights weren’t enough to set the vibe, you’ll also get to experience live music by ZBRA, a band of three guys who are confident to get you moving.

“We are three multi-instrumentalists who play stuff for you to shake your ass or other body parts to. Rocking your face off, then on, then back off again. It’s called the Caged Travolta,” says ZBRA.

Check them out. Can’t see the video? Click here: 

Save the Dates for the upcoming bonfires:

  • November 25th
  • December 9th
  • December 23rd
  • January 13th
  • January 27th
  • February 10th
  • February 24th

Details:

What: The first Lake Worth Beach Bonfires

When: Friday, November 25th, 6 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Where: Across from 10 S Ocean Blvd, Lake Worth, FL 33460

Cost: Free. Parking is metered. 

Contact: 561.533.7395

Note: Bonfires may be cancelled due to weather.

 

Missed Diner En Blanc? Attend this lavish, pop-up feast instead

It’s time for another extravagant bash! Join Dreyfoos in White, a pop-up picnic-style festivity where hundreds of people dress in all-white and feast at a secret location in the city.

Among ritzy themed-centerpieces and tablecapes, everyone enjoys plenty of food and drinks with their peeps. Don’t be fooled by the magic and exclusivity of the night. This party gets turnt up! And unlike Diner En Blanc, it’s for a good cause, too.

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Here are 9 things to know about Dreyfoos in White.

All-white attire

This is not an option. Be as chic with your white garments as possible and host your own al-fresco get-together. Have fun with it. Hats, scarves, gowns and crowns totally expected. This is a made-for-Instagram event.

It’s exclusive

The secret location will be revealed just one hour before the event. Buy your ticket now and wait patiently for the invitation via e-mail.  This just adds more suspense to the event and keeps large crowds away from your spree.

Over the top!

Dreyfoos in White. (Margie Yansura/ Wordsmith Communications)
Dreyfoos in White. (Margie Yansura/ Wordsmith Communications)

Bring your most creative decorations to the table —literally. The event is based on showing off your most extravagant table-espace and creativity. Make an iconic table WITH A THEME and enter different decor competitions. You’ll also need them in order to eat and drink.

Stand out

Party-goers will be competing for “Most Fabulous,” “Most Humorous” and “Judges’ Choice” awards based on the dedication and great taste of their center pieces. The crowd and celebrity judges will be comparing the best of the best.

Bon Appétit

You have two options for your picnic:

  1. Order your food prior to the night through SandyJames Fine Food, pick it up at the event and take it to your table.
  2. Bring your own indulgences, and serve and pour on your finest China to enjoy.

Get lit!

Dreyfoos in White. (Margie Yansura/ Wordsmith Communications)
Dreyfoos in White. (Margie Yansura/ Wordsmith Communications)

The Dreyfoos string and jazz students will provide music throughout the night, and there will even be a flash mob by dance students. And make sure you don’t miss the sparklers. These will light up the night before everyone starts dancing to the music of DJ Brad Barfield.

What not to Bring

Don’t arrive in a U-haul with tables and chairs. The Dreyfoos School of the Arts Foundation will provide these along with sparklers and white cloth napkins for the traditional “napkin twirl,” which kicks off the celebration. Just worry about what goes on the top of your table: decorations, food and drinks.

The Purpose

Funds raised through Dreyfoos in White help support vital educational programs that would otherwise not be funded. Last year, the Dreyfoos School of the Arts Foundation provided $1.3 million in support to the School of the Arts.

Dreyfoos in White. (Margie Yansura/ Wordsmith Communications)
Dreyfoos in White. (Margie Yansura/ Wordsmith Communications)
Still not convinced that this event is can’t-miss? These photos from last year’s party should do the trick.

The Details:
What: Dreyfoos in White

When: Saturday, November 12, 2016, 5:00 p.m.10:00 p.m.
Where: *Secret Location will be revealed by e-mail after purchasing tickets
Tickets: Click here to purchase.

Diner En Blanc: 3 surprising things we learned at the largest dinner party of 2016

Friday evening I arrived at a top secret location to experience the world’s largest dinner party — for only the second time in West Palm Beach. Where did Diner En Blanc take place this year? Currie Park.

As I walked from Flagler Drive to the grass field just a couple hundred feet from the inlet, I realized that the view was stunning but the atmosphere was empty. Guests hadn’t arrived and I wasn’t yet convinced that the evening would live up to its hype.

The Diner en Blanc in downtown West Palm Beach on November 4, 2016. (Yuting Jiang / The Palm Beach Post)
The Diner en Blanc in downtown West Palm Beach on November 4, 2016. (Yuting Jiang / The Palm Beach Post)

A mega event described as a flash mob meets white party? The vision wasn’t clear.

Then four commercial buses pulled up. And some of the most elegantly dressed people made their entrance. One woman wore an ensemble so beautiful it would have gotten her into Wimbledon London with royalty in the early 1900s. She carried a large white, woven basket likely filled with fine China, fresh fruits and cheeses.

Within 45 minutes, I witnessed more than 1500 ivory-cloaked guests mingling, eating and dancing at the elaborate, alfresco dinner tradition that was born in Paris and has since been replicated in more than 60 countries around the world.

One word: Insane.

Robert Suarez, center, celebrates with friends at the Diner en Blanc in downtown West Palm Beach on November 4, 2016. The event which takes place around the world, has participants, dressed all in white, and conducting themselves with the greatest decorum, elegance, and etiquette, meet for a mass "chic picnic" in a public space. (Yuting Jiang / The Palm Beach Post)
Robert Suarez, center, celebrates with friends at Diner en Blanc in downtown West Palm Beach on November 4, 2016. The event, which takes place around the world, has participants, dressed all in white, and conducting themselves with the greatest decorum, elegance, and etiquette, meet for a mass “chic picnic” in a public space. (Yuting Jiang / The Palm Beach Post)

Here’s what I didn’t expect to discover about Diner En Blanc West Palm Beach:

1. There’s Haitian pride all over the secret picnic that will invade West Palm for years to come. 

The concept of friends and family laughing together over a meal is one of the pillars upon which Diner En Blanc stands. It all began when a Frenchman asked a group of his closest friends to wear white and meet him at a public park with a dish.

That’s no different from the Haitian culture.

“Haiti may be going through a hard time, but the people of the Haitian culture love life, always finding time to embrace family and dine together,” said Nora David, one of the three business-savvy, fashion-inclined event planners behind Diner En Blanc West Palm Beach.

The Diner en Blanc in downtown West Palm Beach on November 4, 2016. (Yuting Jiang / The Palm Beach Post)
The Diner en Blanc in downtown West Palm Beach on November 4, 2016. (Yuting Jiang / The Palm Beach Post)

She smiled when I asked her how her culture graced the work that she does as a business woman in the city. “I’m just happy a positive side of the Haitian culture is being talked about,” she said.

2. Life Behind the scenes at Diner En Blanc is not a walk in the park.

While David explains that there is something to say about the simplicity of the event, she iterates that the work happening behind the scene is not a few hours of busy work. This year, thirty volunteers were trained in a series of meetings to keep the traditional elements of the event alive from secrecy to table rules to dress code.

3. There’s no event more turned up and peaceful at the same time.

Drinks started pouring when table legs hit the floor, and no one ate solo. Just like dinner at the wooden table in homes on the movie screen, everyone understood that they had to pick up their forks simultaneously.

After that, feet were two-stepping and bodies were grooving to salsa, reggae, hip-hop, house and EDM music. Every single person was having a good time… And with the 2016 Presidential election just days away, it was really refreshing to see people of all ages and races enjoying each other’s time.

“If we could bring peace in the world, it would be through Diner En Blanc because it is a multicultural event,” David told us as she smiled.

Election 2016: Inside Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago

With the countdown to election day (Nov. 8) at just 6 days away, we take a look inside Donald Trump’s Mar-A-Lago in Palm Beach.

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Exterior of Trump’s bedroom suite. Photos of the interior and exterior of Donald Trump’s Palm Beach Island home “Mar-A-Lago.” This is the first time The Palm Beach Post has been given photo access to Mar-A-Lago since Trump took over. (Damon Higgins/The Palm Beach Post)

Mar-a-Lago was originally built by Marjorie Merriweather Post and opened for the 1927 winter season with 58 bedrooms and 33 bathrooms. When Post died, Mar-a-Lago was willed to the U.S. government. However, Mar-a-Lago’s high maintenance costs prompted the government to decline.

The estate was empty until Trump purchased it in 1985 for $10 million.

Mar-a-Lago now serves as an exclusive club with a $100,000 initiation fee and part-time residence for Trump.

The old ballroom inside Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago. (Damon Higgins/The Palm Beach Post)
The old ballroom inside Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago. (Damon Higgins/The Palm Beach Post)

More on Mar-a-Lago:

A peek inside Donald Trump’s historic Palm Beach palace

Photo gallery: Inside Mar-a-Lago

 

 

Happy Halloween! Photos of Moonfest madness, Clematis by Fright

Happy Halloween you ghouls and goblins! Did you get out and party this weekend? Festivities around West Palm Beach started with Clematis by Fright on Thursday and ended with Moonfest on Saturday. And we’ve got proof there were freaks out at night!

Families and freaks flocked to Clematis by Fright

Families join in the fun at Clematis by Fright in downtown West Palm Beach Thursday.
Families join in the fun at Clematis by Fright in downtown West Palm Beach Thursday.

Pets gotta get dressed up too!

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One of the new haunted trails at Clematis by Fright!

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This family is representin’!

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Check out the rest of the fun from Clematis by Fright in our photo gallery!

Moonfest Madness!

Viviana Alvarez dressed as ‘queen of the souls’ from “The Book of Life” movie!

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Brian Green transforms into a ghost!

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Oh yes! A parade of ghouls!

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Check out the rest of Moonfest madness in our photo gallery!

Why is there a Red Sox plane parked at Palm Beach International?

Yes, that plane at Palm Beach International Airport does have the Boston Red Sox logo on it.

There’s a good reason for that: It belongs to Red Sox minority owner Phillip Morse.

What's the story behind this plane with the logo of the Boston Red Sox on the tail? (Contributed)
What’s the story behind this plane with the logo of the Boston Red Sox on the tail? (Contributed)

Morse — who serves as vice chairman for Fenway Sports Group, the John Henry-led group that owns the Sox — lives on an estate valued at nearly $1.3 million in Jupiter.

The 5,200-square-foot home sits on a half-acre in the Loxahatchee Club community.

His plane, a 1991 Gulfstream IV, can often be spotted from Southern Boulevard, where it parks near the south side of the airport. 

Three readers have contacted this reporter in recent weeks — possibly because I’m the transportation reporter, but more likely because I’m a Red Sox fan — asking where the plane is from and to whom it belongs. Some thought it could belong to Henry, who owns a home in suburban Boca Raton.

 

 

 

 

 

Behind the wheel: Best scenic drives in Palm Beach County

Winding, leisurely or quirky, these are the best scenic drives that show you the marvels of Palm Beach County.

With great weather finally here, it’s time to get into the car and hit the great American highway for a road trip to remember. Destination: Palm Beach County?

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Ficus Nitida is the species of trees lining bridge road on Jupiter Island. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)

With staycations all the rage, you don’t have to go far to add a scenic drive to your road trip bucket list. Within the broad borders of the county, there is more to see than you might think.

From Jupiter to Boca to the western communities, you can gaze upon the natural splendor of ocean, waterways and lakes. Or check out man-made marvels, from ultra-expensive houses to tiny trailers. And stop along the way to dine, shop or take a nature hike.

Most important of all, you can see the place you live in a whole new light. These drives are perfect for a weekend afternoon — or even your lunch hour.

Let’s go road trippin’!

ROAD TRIP NO. 1: A1A, from Palm Beach to Boca Raton

Length: 30 miles

Start/stop: Begin at Worth Avenue and A1A/S. Ocean Boulevard in Palm Beach and head south until you hit Deerfield Beach (with a few stops along the way).

photo gumbo limbo
The thick coastal hammock of mangrove trees at the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton. (Photo by Steve Lopez)

Why this drive delights: This is the Big Kahuna of Palm Beach County scenic drives, winding through the gilded splendor of Palm Beach, past endless (and we mean endless) condos and mega-mansions. You’ll see funky beach towns, a funky trailer park town, and sweet, seagrape-swept views of the Atlantic and Intracoastal Waterway. This is bucket list material. Honestly, if you haven’t taken this drive, you need to ask yourself: Why am I living in Palm Beach County?

 9 sights to see:

1. As you’re heading south through Palm Beach, say hi to The Donald. You can usually get a brief eyeful of the architectural details and big gate of President Donald Trump’s shack, Mar-A-Lago (1100 S. Ocean Blvd.)

Related: A look inside Mar-A-Lago

The Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach is partially visible over its tall hedges on S. Ocean Boulevard. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
The Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach is partially visible over its tall hedges on S. Ocean Boulevard. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

2. Most condos on this drive are tall and dramatically boring, with faux posh names, but we’re partial to two between Sloan’s Curve and Lake Worth: The ’60s mod-looking President of Palm Beach (2505 S. Ocean Blvd., not to be confused with Trump’s house) and the cool white Regency of Palm Beach (2760 S. Ocean Blvd.).

3. When you reach Lake Worth, take a quick left into the Lake Worth Beach complex (10 S. Ocean Blvd.). It’s a good place to grab a bite, and check out the ocean scene. Despite all the upgrades, the pier still looks vintage-funky.

4. As you pass through Manalapan, you get some nice glimpses of the Intracoastal. And ponder this: Have you ever driven this stretch of A1A when half of the oceanside properties are not in tear-down mode?

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Ocean Inlet Park at Ocean Ridge. (Palm Beach Post file photo)

5. Between Manalapan and Ocean Inlet Park (6990 N. Ocean Blvd., Boynton Beach), there is a lovely, shady stretch of canopied trees and seagrape splendor. The beach-changing houses here along the ocean are probably nicer than your entire home. Roll down the window, take your foot off the gas and enjoy it.

6. Past Boynton, take a jog left on Corrine Street, right on Old Ocean Boulevard and head down to the marvelous mystery of A1A: How does a trailer town still exist here? With views of both the Atlantic and the Intracoastal? Briny Breezes is one of those places where you can test a relationship theory. Drive down tight little Hibiscus Street, with quaint mobile homes on both sides. By the time you get to the end at the town library and shuffleboard court, one spouse will be ready to chuck all the hassles of suburban home ownership and move right in. The other spouse will be ready to chuck you for suggesting it.

The Lake Worth Casino at Lake Worth Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
The Lake Worth Casino at Lake Worth Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

7. As you pass through the town of Gulf Stream, look up. Towering pines flank the roadway.

8. By this point in the trip, you may be weary of looking at condos blocking the ocean view. Delray Beach’s commercial district at Atlantic Avenue is made for a stop-and-shop. Or head down to Boca Raton’s numerous beach parks and the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center (1801 N. Ocean Blvd.).

9. You’re almost there. Past the Boca Raton Resort and Club and over the drawbridge and you’re into Deerfield Beach, the end of your journey. Except you have to turn around and go all the way back. But it was worth it, right?

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ROAD TRIP NO. 2: Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach

Length: 10-12 miles
Start/Stop: North Flagler near Northwood Road. Go south to South Flagler and Arlington Place.
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Currie Park on N. Flagler Drive in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: Beginning near the pastel-colored shopping and restaurant district along Northwood Road, this leisurely drive takes you past calming views of the Intracoastal, and the glittering downtown commercial district of condos, restaurants and waterside walkways. Once you get through downtown, settle into the most relaxing part of the drive, a non-stop travel reel of upscale homes with broad lawns, a mishmash of funky architectural styles, and a sweet walkway along the Intracoastal (though the road section south of Southern definitely needs repaving). By the time you get to South Flagler’s terminus at Arlington Place, your blood pressure should be a lot lower. And you can do it in less than an hour.
George S. Petty Park on Washington Road in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
George S. Petty Park on Washington Road in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

5 sights to see:

1. Don’t miss the curved, copper-colored dome of Temple Beth El (2815 N. Flagler), built in 1970 and a hidden architectural jewel of the city.

2. Pull into Currie Park, at N. Flagler and 23rd Street, and watch boats speeding down the Intracoastal Waterway and people walking along the park’s well-maintained shoreline. (Other nearby sights include the Palm Beach Maritime Museum and the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial).

Palm Beach Maritime Museum on N. Flagler Drive in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
Palm Beach Maritime Museum on N. Flagler Drive in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
3. When downtown (which might require a slight detour because of construction on the north bridge), stop and gawk at the mega-yachts perched at Palm Harbor Marina (400 N. Flagler).
4. Glimpse our favorite sign on a church: “No Skate Boarding Allowed” posted on the front of the historic First Church of Christ Scientist (809 S. Flagler), built in 1928 in a grandiose Classical Revival style, where the steep steps are apparently an irresistible temptation to board riders.
5. A moment of Zen: the pocket-like George S. Petty Park (Washington Road at Royal Park Road), though in truth all of the El Cid-Southland Park area is pretty Zen if you’re into gazing at expensive homes and condos. We’re partial to the tower-like house at Washington and Westminster. (An FYI on directions: Flagler turns into Washington, then converts back to Flagler via Greenwood Avenue a little farther south. Why? We don’t know, either.)
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ROAD TRIP NO. 3: Jupiter to Juno Beach

Length: 15 miles
Start/Stop: Begin at U.S. 1 and Indiantown Road, Jupiter. Go south on U.S. 1 to A1A/Ocean Drive, Juno Beach. Then turn left/north on A1A all the way back to U.S. 1 and A1A, Jupiter.
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Boats pass by Jupiter Lighthouse. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: This trip beginning on U.S. 1 south of Harbourside Place reflects a lot of what makes north county coastal living unique. There is the chance to see great swaths of dunes and undeveloped land in the middle of the usual commercial and residential development. Once you turn north onto A1A in Juno Beach, it’s a laid-back drive of condos, parks, seagrapes and glimpses of the Atlantic, all populated by north county’s legion of bicyclists, surfers and beachgoers. You’ll also eyeball such familiar landmarks as the Juno Beach Pier, Carlin Park and the Jupiter Lighthouse.
Pelican Lake. (Palm Beach Post file photo)
Pelican Lake. (Palm Beach Post file photo)

4 sights to see:

1. The Jupiter Ridge Natural Area(1800 S. U.S. 1), a 271-acre slash and scrub pine preserve that is worth a hike or run along its boardwalk and sandy trails. The county purchased it for $23 million in 1993. (A little farther down U.S. 1 is another stop and walk spot: the Juno Dunes Natural Area (14501 U.S. 1), as well as the Loggerhead Marine Life Center, 14200 U.S. 1).
2. In Juno Beach, make a quick right off A1A/Ocean Drive onto Celestial Way, the town center of Juno Beach. This is your Zen moment: A 1-mile pathway winds around Pelican Lake with two gazebos, and lots of ducks and wading birds to see. Stop and take a walk.
Diners enjoy the intracoastal views at Guanabanas restaurant in Jupiter. (Richard Graulich/The Palm Beach Post)
Diners enjoy the intracoastal views at Guanabanas restaurant in Jupiter. (Richard Graulich/The Palm Beach Post)
3. Right after the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, turn right on Jupiter Beach Park Road and take a winding ride through the beach park (1375 Jupiter Beach Road), which terminates with a gobsmacking view of the Jupiter Inlet and Atlantic Ocean. You can also walk here to adjacent Dubois Park, one of the best places to take in picture-perfect views of the Jupiter Lighthouse.
4. At the end of your trip, you hit the commercial bottleneck of restaurants and bars Guanabana’s Schooner’s, Square Grouper, Jetty’s, etc.). It might be worth it to end your ride here with a walk up tiny, funky Love Street (don’t miss the handpainted sign with lyrics to The Doors’ “Love Street”). With all the new commercial development plans, it may not stay funky for long.
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ROAD TRIP NO 4.: The Glades

Length: 37 miles
Start/Stop: Go west on Southern Boulevard past Lion Country Safari as it turns into U.S. 441. Once you get to the end of the road, turn right to Pahokee, where you can end your trip at Lake Okeechobee.
Royal palm trees line SR 715 in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
Royal palm trees line SR 715 in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: You can live in Palm Beach County for decades and rarely make a drive out to the Glades. That is a mistake. Head west on Southern Boulevard and, all of a sudden, it’s like the difference between watching a movie on an iPhone and seeing it blown up on an IMAX screen. The sky is bigger. The clouds are bigger. The horizon line of green fields and the Glades’ famous black muck soil goes on forever, interrupted only by giant power lines and the occasional belching smokestack. Driving out U.S. 441, you realize how much development blots out your broader vision of the world. Take your kids and have a teachable moment in how your food is grown and harvested.
A camper at the Pahokee Marina and Campground on Lake Okeechobee in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
A camper at the Pahokee Marina and Campground on Lake Okeechobee in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

2 sights to see:

1. Stop in at Paul Rardin Park (4600 State Road 715). A steep (very steep) road leads up to the boat ramp and an overlook of the lake. You can walk along the dike and join other park goers sitting on the bank and enjoying the scenery.
2. Driving into Pahokee, you might be surprised to find the road lined with as many palm trees as you’ll find on Palm Beach. Once you arrive downtown, turn left into the Pahokee Marina and Campground (190 N. Lake Ave.), a perfect place to gaze on the enormity of the big lake and end your road trip. (Wondering whether to invest the time? Hey, Bruce Springsteen made this trip on his chopper a couple years ago, and if it’s good enough for the Boss …)
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ROAD TRIP NO. 5: Dixie Highway through West Palm Beach/Lake Worth/Lantana

Length: 7. 2 miles
Start/Stop: S. Dixie Highway and Belvedere Road, West Palm Beach, south to Dixie Highway and Ocean Avenue, Lantana
West Palm Beach's Carvel ice cream cone sign on Dixie Highway. (Madeline Gray/The Palm Beach Post)
West Palm Beach’s Carvel ice cream cone sign on Dixie Highway. (Madeline Gray/The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: What’s scenic is in the eye of the beholder. Even a busy commercial highway has its charms. We could have picked Military Trail or, uh, I-95, but we recommend Dixie Highway because of its kitschy signs and architectural oddities. How this mishmash of businesses operates on Dixie is one of the wonders of this street, where quirky names abound — The Mad Hatter Lounge, the Tanks A Lot aquarium shop. Enjoy the broad range of commercial enterprises — ethnic restaurants and grocers, car repair shops, upscale antique stores, churches, funeral homes, an ice cream factory, dive bars, tattered remnants of Florida’s once-vibrant motor court culture and even Lake Worth City Hall (which once doubled as a movie set in the film “Body Heat.”)
Exterior of The Palm Beach Post building. (Riuchard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)
Exterior of The Palm Beach Post building. (Riuchard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)

3 sights to see:

1. The tour begins by going south on Dixie at The Palm Beach Post building (say Hi to us!) Immediately on your left is the first quirky sign you need to Instagram: the giant hammer on top of Hall Hardware (2750 S. Dixie), where Martha Stewart visited recently. More sweet sights in West Palm: the Howley’s restaurant logo sign at 4700 S. Dixie (“Cooked In Sight, Must Be Right”), and the double sky-high ice cream cones at Carvel (5901 S. Dixie).

Old Key Lime House in Lantana. (Bruce R. Bennett/The Palm Beach Post)
Old Key Lime House in Lantana. (Bruce R. Bennett/The Palm Beach Post)

2. Once you cross the line into Lake Worth, check out the crinkled pie-crust shaped lettering on The Upper Crust pie shop (2015 N. Dixie, Lake Worth), the pithy, pungent sayings on the Harry’s Banana Farm bar sign (1919 N. Dixie), the art deco, birthday cake-like curves of Blue Front BBQ (1132 N. Dixie), the cool jazz mural on the side of Chafin Music (608 N. Dixie), the big fish on top of Tuppen’s Marine and Tackle (1002 N. Dixie), and, of course, the big horse sitting on top of McLelland’s Inc. Saddlery (317 N. Dixie).

3. In Lantana, see the cute, old-school Barefoot Mailman Motel (138 S. Dixie in Lantana). And end your tour with a short jaunt east down Ocean Avenue in Lantana to behold the blindingly green exterior of the Old Key Lime House (300 E. Ocean Ave.)— it’s the perfect only-in-Florida end point to your funky drive.
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ROAD TRIP NO. 6: Jupiter Lighthouse to Jupiter Island

Length: 30 miles
Start/Stop: Begin at Indiantown Road and South Beach Road, Jupiter. Head east over the Intracoastal bridge, then veer north past Coral Cove Park and into Martin County. Once you pass through Jupiter Island, turn left/west at Bridge Road in Hobe Sound, then left/south on U.S. 1 back to Palm Beach County.
Areas around (and under) the beach access ramp, and in the dunes, at Coral Cove Park.
Areas around (and under) the beach access ramp, and in the dunes, at Coral Cove Park.
Why this drive delights: Jupiter Island and its endless enclaves of the wealthy is the north version of Palm Beach. You won’t see much, because of the towering landscaping, but that landscaping is divine, the drive is blissful and you can play a game of counting how many “Service Entrance” signs you spot. (Lots of bicyclists through here, so drive carefully.)

5 sights to see:

Large wave crashes on shore at Blowing Rocks Preserve. (Palm Beach Post file photo)
Large wave crashes on shore at Blowing Rocks Preserve. (Palm Beach Post file photo)

 

1. If you’ve never been to the 73-acre Blowing Rocks Preserve (574 South Beach Road), run by the Nature Conservancy, it’s worth a stop, especially if the water is spuming through the limestone rocks on the beach. It’s our mini-Big Sur.
2. On Jupiter Island, stay right on South Beach Road when it forks and make a quick stop at Christ Memorial Chapel (52 S. Beach Road), a Spanish-style church built in 1939. (Where else will you see a church that opens onto a broad golf course fairway?)
Ficus Nitida is the species of trees lining bridge road on Jupiter Island. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)
Ficus Nitida is the species of trees lining bridge road on Jupiter Island. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)
3. When you reach South Beach Road and Estrada Drive, take a left and wind down a beautiful street of pretty houses that terminates at the Jupiter Island Club, 1 Estrada, with its gorgeous club building, manicured lawns and yacht dock. (And you’re not a member, so keep on driving.)
4. Back on South Beach Road, head past the Bridge Road intersection and go all the way to the terminus at the Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge. Check out the mountainous, perfectly sculpted dune/mound that separates the road from the beach.
5. Once you get to Bridge Road and U.S 1, turn south on U.S. 1 and take the semi-hilly drive back to Palm Beach County, past sparkling glimpses of the Intracoastal and more dunes at Jonathan Dickinson State Park (16450 SE Federal Highway). Bonus points if you can spot the nearby gated driveway to a certain Palm Beach County-bred movie star’s house.

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ROAD TRIP NO. 7: Central/North end of Palm Beach

Length: 12 miles
Start/Stop: Head north on Cocoanut Row at Royal Palm Way, past the Society of Four Arts and the Flagler Museum, across Royal Poinciana Way and down Bradley Place as it turns into North Lake Way. Turn left onto Country Club Road and head all the way up north past the Sailfish Club, then scoot over to North Ocean Boulevard and head south, as it turns into South County Road. End at Phipps Plaza and South County Road.
The coral cut on Country Club Road is on the west side of Palm Beach. (Meghan McCarthy/The Palm Beach Post)
The coral cut on Country Club Road is on the west side of Palm Beach. (Meghan McCarthy/The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: Hey, pretty much all of Palm Beach is a scenic getaway, and who doesn’t like to look at places you’ll never live? You can see a mix of eye-catching homes draped in towering landscaping (celebs like Rush Limbaugh and Howard Stern have abodes in the north end) and the tight roads are fun to drive.
5 sights to see:
1. When you turn onto Country Club Road from North Lake Way, behold one of the island’s most dazzling natural wonders: the deep coral cut that towers above both sides of the road (don’t forget to look for the Bastille-like prison window in the cut, which has prompted all sorts of urban legends, but is really just a water department door.). Coming out of the cut, you get a dazzling view of the Intracoastal along the Lake Trail (which you should walk or bike at some point) and the mega-yachts parked at boat yards on the West Palm side.
Susan and Chris Cristopoulos take a rest Thursday afternoon during their bike ride along the Lake Trail near the Palm Beach Country Club. (Palm Beach Post file photo)
Susan and Chris Cristopoulos take a rest Thursday afternoon during their bike ride along the Lake Trail near the Palm Beach Country Club. (Palm Beach Post file photo)
2. Once you get to Arabian Road, curve left as it becomes Indian Road, then jog north on N. Ocean Boulevard to check out the northernmost point of the island and the short dock, where you can see cruise ships heading out to the Atlantic.
3. Heading back south on N. Ocean, enjoy more winding curves, glimpses of Atlantic (especially around the Palm Beach Country Club) and keep up with the construction teardowns and buildups that always seem to be happening on the north end.
The Breakers.
The Breakers.
4. The leisurely drive continues south past a shady canopy of trees between Phipps Estate Road and Sanford Avenue, and such local sights as Green’s Pharmacy, St. Edward’s Church, the old Paramount Theater complex, The Breakers and Bethesda-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church, all worth a visit.
5. End your trip on one of our favorite pocket roads by turning right off S. County Road into Phipps Plaza, a cute little roundabout of architectural offices and tucked-away homes and no parking spots for the hoi-polloi. This is Palm Beach, after all.

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ROAD TRIP NO. 8: Wellington

Length: 8 miles
Start/stop: Turn off Southern Boulevard onto Bink’s Forest Drive, and drive up to Aero Club Drive. Take a right there and head down to Greenbrier Shores Boulevard, where you can turn right into the Aero Club neighborhood.
An airplane parked in the Aero Club in Wellington. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)
An airplane parked in the Aero Club in Wellington. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)

 

Why this drive delights: It’s not every housing development that boasts airplane hangar garages, and it’s unusual to see planes parked as casually as Cadillacs in back yards. And don’t forget to check out the fun street names — Boing Street, Lindbergh Lane, Take Off Place, etc.
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ROAD TRIP NO. 9: Lake Osborne to High Ridge Road

Length: 6.5 miles
Start/Stop: Turn off Lake Worth Road onto Lake Osborne Drive. Once you reach Lantana Road, double back and turn right on High Ridge Road, ending at Hypoluxo Road.
Lake Osborne Park on the west side of High Ridge Road, south of Lantana Road. (Thomas Cordy/The Palm Beach Post)
Lake Osborne Park on the west side of High Ridge Road, south of Lantana Road. (Thomas Cordy/The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: This is a scenic waterfront drive that reminds you of Old Florida. Revel in a leisurely, miles-long ride around the other big Lake O in the county.
 2 sights to see:
1. On Lake Osborne Drive, past the entrance to John Prince Park, there are plenty of spots to pull your car over and watch fishermen on the lake, or join the sidewalk parade. The apartment complexes and houses aren’t your usual waterfront property — they’re older, more middle-class, not Mega-Mansion land, as though somehow developers were not given the secret password to come here, tear down and overbuild. (And this quiet, neighborhood feel is what some people are worried about losing if the Atlanta Braves build a spring training complex at John Prince.)
John Prince Park.
John Prince Park.
2. High Ridge Road is a sweet, short, semi-hilly drive (hence the name.) Just past High Ridge and Hypoluxo Road, visit the High Ridge Natural Scrub Area (7300 High Ridge Rd.), another pocket nature preserve where you can stretch your legs and end your journey.
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