5 things to know about the Stuart Air Show

Military jets take over the South Florida skies as part of the Stuart Air Show at the Witham Field Airport from Friday, November 3 through Sunday, November 5 2017. If you’re into this sort of stuff, this event will go beyond your expectations as it’s not just a visual show, but an interactive experience for the entire family.

Here are 5 things you need to know:

1. Aerobatic performances and Air Show

Of course, the #1 reason for most to attend is to watch these incredible airplanes do all kinds of turns and tricks at high speeds and altitude. And for the first time this year, there will be a helicopter stunt show. Crazy!

Aside from machinery, skydivers with smoke will be taking center “stage,” and when night falls, a display of fireworks with nighttime aerobatics will illuminate the sky. It’s like Circus de Solei in the air, basically.

2. Aircraft Rides

File Photo: Lt. Colonel John Klatt, of the Air National Guard aerobatic team, takes Daphne Duret, a reporter at The Palm Beach Post, on an in-flight interview Thursday above Stuart in 2009. (Sarah Grile/The Palm Beach Post)
File Photo: Lt. Colonel John Klatt, of the Air National Guard aerobatic team, takes Daphne Duret, a reporter at The Palm Beach Post, on an in-flight interview Thursday above Stuart in 2009. (Sarah Grile/The Palm Beach Post)

This should actually be your new top reason to attend from now on. Even though it’s pricey, the Stuart Air Show offers the opportunity to jump on one of these bad boys as a passenger and take flight. See the city from a sky soldier’s point of view. There are different aircrafts you can choose from. See the list here.

3. WWII Battle Reenactment & Weapons Demonstration

File photo of a WWII re-enactor watching planes (Vada Mossavat/The Palm Beach Post)
File photo of a WWII re-enactor watching planes (Vada Mossavat/The Palm Beach Post)

Fire! Boom. Actors and performers from all over the country will perform a show to honor our troops. With vintage uniforms, military equipment from the era, tanks and artillery, this show will recreate the battlegrounds of our military from back in the day.

According to the site, this year the WWII Round Canopy Paratroopers will jump into the reenactment with a WWII aircraft flying overhead thanks to The Road To Victory Military Museum.

4. Kids’ Zone and Amusement Park

File photo by Bruce R. Bennett/The Palm Beach Post
File photo by Bruce R. Bennett/The Palm Beach Post

While you have a drink with your buddies, your kids can be playing with theirs. There will be free activities such as face painting, letters to the troops and scavenger hunts in the kids’ zone. There’s an educational side too, so kids can learn about aviation and our military in a variety of fun games. To top it off, plenty of amusement park rides will be keep them busy.

5. Static Displays

File Photo: Back in 2011, students in the Automotive Collision Repair and Refinishing Program, a Career & Technical Education Academy at Martin County High School, received a hands-on history lesson. They gave a 1952 Mig UTI a make-over in time for the Stuart Air Show.
File Photo: Back in 2011, students in the Automotive Collision Repair and Refinishing Program, a Career & Technical Education Academy at Martin County High School, received a hands-on history lesson. They gave a 1952 Mig UTI a make-over in time for the Stuart Air Show.

While seeing the air show is great, actually taking your time to check out the aircrafts is something else. Walk around them, go ahead and take your selfies, and get peeks at the interiors of these military vehicles. The Stuart Air Show is as much an outdoors museum as it is a theater and a classroom. Enjoy!

If this list wasn’t enough to convince you to go, maybe you’d enjoy these free, lowkey ways to see the action from a couple miles away.


The Deets:

What: Stuart Air Show

When: Friday, November 3 through Sunday, November 5

Where: Witham Field Airport. 2011 SE Airport Rd, Stuart, FL 34996

Contact: 772-781-4882 or info@stuartairshow.com

Tickets: Get your tickets before November 4 and save $10 off general admission. All tickets are available online.

Note From The Stuart Air Show:

  • Advance tickets for the popular Dirty Flight Suit Party (Nov. 4), Friday Night Air Show and upgrade options for Spectator Seating, the Heineken Beer Garden, or the top-flight Bombers Squadron are available for purchase at www.StuartAirshow.com.
  • Standard pre-purchase ticket options are $5 for veterans/military (military ID required) and children 6-12 (5 and under free), $15 for children 13+ and adults. Tickets at the gate will be $25 (age 13+) and $5 for veterans/military (military ID required).

Battle of the Sexes: Who won the Thrift Shop Challenge?

The Palm Beach Post introduces a new, monthly series: “Battle of the Sexes.”

Reporters Julio Poletti and Corvaya Jeffries of The Palm Beach Post will compete against each other in monthly challenges. The fun part? Community members like you will help decide the challenges.

capture1

To get the ball rollin’, Julio and Corvaya have already finished their first battle, and it’s up to you to decide who won.


Fall in Love with Thrifting

Fall can be pretty much of a joke for most Floridians.

 

Beyond some lightweight sweaters and scarves, the beach is still in our backyard, the days are still sunny and #FallinFlorida remains a destination for most of the country.

Related: Best scenic drives in Palm Beach County

Still, the temps drop, wardrobes change and themed-festivities such as pumpkin carvings and Halloween parties go down.

For this reason, the first Battle of the Sexes challenge is to help you, and us, be ready for cool breezes and hot cocoa sippin’ on patios.

The Challenge

Build an entire fall outfit from a local thrift shop, which could be worn to any upcoming celebration.

Related: Best thrift shops in Palm Beach County

The Rules 

 

Yes they are, Regina!

Watch the Competition before voting

How to judge

  • Is this a fall outfit?
  • Does it fit?
  • Is it stylish?
  • Is it a complete look?

Vote for the winner!

 

Decide who followed the rules and write ONLY the name of your pick in the comment section of the Facebook Post or take the poll below.

Pitch a challenge

What do you think Julio and Corvaya should compete in next? Leave a comment on the story or on Facebook. Or, just vote for a battle that we’ve already brainstormed.

Now that the challenge is over, enjoy a Thrift Shop-inspired jam that topped the Billboard charts for four weeks in 2013. Can’t see the video? Click here.

Moonfest 2016: Top 10 tips on dressing up for this crazy event

Thousands of people will be at Moonfest on Clematis street, in downtown West Palm Beach, from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. Saturday night. Maybe as many as 30,000 if we’re talking the number of bodies the organizers expect the event to attract.

Even though this is a grown folks night out (21+), every year there are costume fails—no matter the age. Here are the dos and don’ts of dressing up for Palm Beach County’s biggest Halloween extravaganza.

Are you in the PostNOW app? Click here for much funnier, GIF edition.

DON’T wear one of these. This is what will happen.

DO wear comfortable shoes.

Did we mention that this event will stretch from the 100 block to the 500 block of Clematis Street?

DO avoid nip slips.

There’s a such thing as fashion tape. Worth it.

DO leave your sharp prop at home.

Security may not let you in.

DO think about where you will put all of your dough.

DON’T do drugs.

Overheating happens. Dehydration is real.

DON’T waste your time putting together a religiously or politically offensive costume.

People will be drunk. They will try to beat you up.

DO use this as an opportunity to wear what you wear around your house when no ones around.

DO have fun with your costumes. Get creative!

 


The Deets: 

What: Moonfest2016

Where: 500-100 blocks, Clematis St. West Palm Beach

When: October 29th from 8:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m.

How Much?: Pay $15 for a general admission ticket or $100 for VIP status here.


Not into Moonfest? Check out our list of best Halloween events in PBC here.

What’s so special about that pumpkin?

Happy National Pumpkin Day! Need ideas on how to celebrate this national day? We have some for you!

First off, maybe you should eat some. Seriously. Pumpkin is super good for you. It’s full of fiber, and fiber is good for you heart. That’s a win. It’s also good for your eyes, thanks to all the Vitamin A. But there’s more: Pumpkin also promotes weight loss and can help you sleep better.

Related: Best Halloween festivals, parties in town

Oh, but before you go gettin’ all Starbucks Pumpkin Spiced Latte crazy, know this: All that high-calorie, high sugar processed pumpkin is not where the good stuff is at. It’s best you roast, steam or even mash the veggie to reap the benefits.

Not into eating it? Try your hand at carving instead. Visit one of these fun pumpkin patches to pick out your favorite to carve or for fall decorating: Best Pumpkin Patches of Palm Beach County

Kylee Wells (left), age 3-1/2, gets some help from Tanner Luna, also 3-1/2, as she sizes up the pumpkins at Good Shepherd United Methodist Church on Military Trail in suburban West Palm Beach Monday, October 10, 2016. Good Shepherd's pumpkins came in Saturday from New Mexico, where they are grown by the Navajo Nation without pesticides or GMOs. The pumpkin patch is open 9am-9pm Monday through Saturday, 1pm-9pm Sundays, through October 30. The church has storytellers on site weekdays 9am-noon, as well as a photo booth and bean bag toss. Proceeds from the pumpkin sales will be used for Good Shepherd's youth mission trips; they hope to go to one of the areas affected by Hurricane Matthew next summer. Kylee and Tanner are in the church's Shepherd Care preschool. (Lannis Waters / The Palm Beach Post)
Kylee Wells (left), age 3-1/2, gets some help from Tanner Luna, also 3-1/2, as she sizes up the pumpkins at Good Shepherd United Methodist Church on Military Trail in suburban West Palm Beach Monday, October 10, 2016. Good Shepherd’s pumpkins came in Saturday from New Mexico, where they are grown by the Navajo Nation without pesticides or GMOs. The pumpkin patch is open 9am-9pm Monday through Saturday, 1pm-9pm Sundays, through October 30. (Lannis Waters / The Palm Beach Post)

Speaking of pumpkin decorating, have you seen any teal pumpkins around town? Wondering what’s the deal with that? It’s part of the Teal Pumpkin Project. Because food allergies shouldn’t keep a kid out of the trick-or-treating spirit.

Can’t see the video? Click here.

Mark your house with a teal pumpkin this weekend and then go one step further: Put a pin in it on this rad interactive map so other local moms know that their kid won’t get a candy-let-down at your door. It’s simple. Just click on the plus sign in the right corner of the map to add deets about your non-food treats.

Or if teal isn’t really your color this Halloween season, maybe you prefer pumpkins of the underwater variety. Because, yes, underwater pumpkin carving is totally a thing that’s happening in Florida. So grab the kids and hit the road for a visit to the Sea Life Aquarium in Orlando this weekend.

And finally, we couldn’t celebrate National Pumpkin Day without a nod to Internet sensation, Trumpkins. That’s right. Perhaps you’d like to try your hand at carving a #Trumpkin instead?

Since the video pretty much says it alllet’s move on.

However you decide to spend this trending holiday, don’t forget to make like NASA and share the joy with #NationalPumpkinDay.

Photos: Who was the Witch of Wellington? The answer with amazing photos

Suzan Strauss was known as the Lava Lady in Los Angeles in the 1990's, where she let photographer Osker Jimenez capture her in her DIY couture. (Osker Jimenez Exposure House)
Suzan Strauss on a street near her Los Angeles home in the 1990’s. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
In Wellington, Strauss was a regular at local thrift stores. (Lourdes Cabrera)
In Wellington, Strauss was a regular at Wellington thrift stores. (Lourdes Cabrera)

In Florida’s suffocating heat, she wore head-to-toe black, as if in mourning a loss.

Consequently, locals dubbed her the Witch of Wellington.

Read the full story about this eccentric Wellington and Los Angeles icon

But in Los Angeles in the 1980’s and ’90’s, Suzan Strauss was a street style star for the colorful outfits she designed, always worn with platform boots as high as horses’ hooves and a towering hat covering her hair.

The effect, said photographer Osker Jimenez, was to make her look seven feet tall as she glided slowly along Melrose Avenue in West Hollywood, among the era’s pierced punks, dark goths and glam rock kids.

Fascinated with this self-assured, eccentrically-dressed woman, Jimenez photographed her for a decade, eventually publishing two books and staging a photo exhibition of his Strauss photos.

Photographer Osker Jimenez had an art gallery show of his photos of Strauss superimposed against stark landscapers. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
Photographer Osker Jimenez had an art gallery show of his photos of Strauss superimposed against stark landscapes. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)

 

The Lava Lady waters her garden from the lava rock wall surrounding her Los Angeles home. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
The Lava Lady waters her garden from the lava rock wall surrounding her Los Angeles home. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)

 

 

Strauss' Wellington home, where she constructed semi-circular courtyards at each end of the house, which was decorated with a row of upside down flower pots. (Post photo/Barbara Marshall)
Strauss’ Wellington home, where she constructed semi-circular courtyards at each end of the house, which was decorated with a row of upside down flower pots. (Post photo/Barbara Marshall)

 

(Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
(Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
(Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
Strauss was born to an Orthodox Jewish family. In accordance with custom, she always wore hats or wigs to cover her hair. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
In Los Angeles, she carefully cultivated the garden surrounding her home. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
In Los Angeles, she carefully cultivated the garden surrounding the lava rock-covered home that gave her the name “Lava Lady.” (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
Another of Jimenez' photos of Strauss, superimposed on a background of fireworks. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)
Another of Jimenez’ photos of Strauss, superimposed on a background of fireworks. (Osker Jimenez/Exposure House)

The 11 best volunteer opportunities for animal lovers in Palm Beach County

Having a pet for a couple of hours a week sure is a lovely idea. And it’s not too far-fetched. You can volunteer. It’s as simple as that. Do good for the community, get some good karmic energy and play with dogs and cats all day.

Okay, well, that’s oversimplifying the position; it’s not all fun and games. It is serious work in need of dedicated individuals.

 

First, where you can volunteer in Palm Beach County:

Central PBC

West PBC County

North PBC County

South PBC


Puppies waiting to meet their families at the Countdown to Zero event at the Palm Beach County Convention Center (Contributed).
Puppies waiting to meet their families at the Countdown to Zero event at the Palm Beach County Convention Center (Contributed).

Next, what you need to know

At most rescue agencies, there is a critical need for volunteers. Some rescues run almost 100% off of volunteers.

The hours you’re needed can vary depending on the organization, but at Peggy Adams, for example, volunteers must commitment to at least four hours a week.

Did someone say, “Puppy cuddler?” Yep. That’s kind of think in animal shelters, and volunteers can definitely do that, and then some. 

Animal rescues need help bottle-feeding cats, walking dogs, and yes, picking up poop and cleaning out cages. You can also help by being a shelter tour guide and by showing the pets off to potential adopters.

Another form of volunteering is fostering. As a foster parent, you can learn all about the dog, rehabilitate it if need and provide it with a loving home until the agency is able to find the dog a furever home.

But volunteer positions aren’t just about directly helping with the animals. You can help indirectly, too. These organizations are businesses, and it takes a lot of pieces to keep them afloat. If you have skills in marketing, graphic design, photography or customer service, there’s a place for the animal lover in you to really help. Without these tasks being filled, finding furever homes for some of these animals would be near impossible.

Remember, volunteering is a serious commitment — almost like getting the actually pet. Not only does the organization take the time to train and trust you, but the animals learn to trust you as well.

Can’t get enough? Did you know you that you can turn your pup into a therapy dog?

Why is there a Red Sox plane parked at Palm Beach International?

Yes, that plane at Palm Beach International Airport does have the Boston Red Sox logo on it.

There’s a good reason for that: It belongs to Red Sox minority owner Phillip Morse.

What's the story behind this plane with the logo of the Boston Red Sox on the tail? (Contributed)
What’s the story behind this plane with the logo of the Boston Red Sox on the tail? (Contributed)

Morse — who serves as vice chairman for Fenway Sports Group, the John Henry-led group that owns the Sox — lives on an estate valued at nearly $1.3 million in Jupiter.

The 5,200-square-foot home sits on a half-acre in the Loxahatchee Club community.

His plane, a 1991 Gulfstream IV, can often be spotted from Southern Boulevard, where it parks near the south side of the airport. 

Three readers have contacted this reporter in recent weeks — possibly because I’m the transportation reporter, but more likely because I’m a Red Sox fan — asking where the plane is from and to whom it belongs. Some thought it could belong to Henry, who owns a home in suburban Boca Raton.

 

 

 

 

 

Cool weather is here! Check out some of the best outdoor things to do in Palm Beach County

With the cool front that’s heading our way, the weather will be near perfect this weekend! Low humidity. Mostly sunny! So, what better time to get outside and play! And we’ve got a great list of options for you!

Wanna hit a beach and enjoy the sun?

Best Beaches of Palm Beach County

photo best beach
Riviera Beach Municipal Beach. (Allen Eyestone/The Palm Beach Post)

Sip a cocktail and dine with a view? Oh yes, please!

A table with a view: Best al fresco dining spots

A table by the sea at the new Breeze Ocean Kitchen, located at the Eau Palm Beach Resort in Manalapan. (Liz Balmaseda/ Palm Beach Post)
A table by the sea at the new Breeze Ocean Kitchen, located at the Eau Palm Beach Resort in Manalapan. (Liz Balmaseda/ Palm Beach Post)

What about a bike ride?

Five furious off-road bike trails in Palm Beach County

Daryll McKenzie, heads down the hill with riders behind him during the Sandblaster Mountain Bike Race Series at Dyer Park. (Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)
Daryll McKenzie, heads down the hill with riders behind him during the Sandblaster Mountain Bike Race Series at Dyer Park. (Greg Lovett/The Palm Beach Post)

Want to get your zen on? A beautiful garden or park will help with that!

Best public gardens and best parks in Palm Beach County

photo mounts botanical
The Mounts Botanical Garden in West Palm Beach. (Lannis Waters/The Palm Beach Post)

Take a road trip with the top down? We’ve got you covered!

Behind the wheel: Most scenic drives in Palm Beach County

A camper at the Pahokee Marina and Campground on Lake Okeechobee in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
A camper at the Pahokee Marina and Campground on Lake Okeechobee in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

Going by boat? Wanna tie up for a sunset sip or an afternoon burger?

Dock and dine: Best waterfront dining 

The view of the Jupiter Lighthouse from Jetty's restaurant in Jupiter.  (Richard Graulich/The Palm Beach Post)
The view of the Jupiter Lighthouse from Jetty’s restaurant in Jupiter. (Richard Graulich/The Palm Beach Post)

Want to find the perfect scene for your Instagram pic of the day? or weekend?

10 best Instagram-worthy spots in North Palm Beach County

Behind the wheel: Best scenic drives in Palm Beach County

Winding, leisurely or quirky, these are the best scenic drives that show you the marvels of Palm Beach County.

With great weather finally here, it’s time to get into the car and hit the great American highway for a road trip to remember. Destination: Palm Beach County?

photo jupiter island
Ficus Nitida is the species of trees lining bridge road on Jupiter Island. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)

With staycations all the rage, you don’t have to go far to add a scenic drive to your road trip bucket list. Within the broad borders of the county, there is more to see than you might think.

From Jupiter to Boca to the western communities, you can gaze upon the natural splendor of ocean, waterways and lakes. Or check out man-made marvels, from ultra-expensive houses to tiny trailers. And stop along the way to dine, shop or take a nature hike.

Most important of all, you can see the place you live in a whole new light. These drives are perfect for a weekend afternoon — or even your lunch hour.

Let’s go road trippin’!

ROAD TRIP NO. 1: A1A, from Palm Beach to Boca Raton

Length: 30 miles

Start/stop: Begin at Worth Avenue and A1A/S. Ocean Boulevard in Palm Beach and head south until you hit Deerfield Beach (with a few stops along the way).

photo gumbo limbo
The thick coastal hammock of mangrove trees at the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton. (Photo by Steve Lopez)

Why this drive delights: This is the Big Kahuna of Palm Beach County scenic drives, winding through the gilded splendor of Palm Beach, past endless (and we mean endless) condos and mega-mansions. You’ll see funky beach towns, a funky trailer park town, and sweet, seagrape-swept views of the Atlantic and Intracoastal Waterway. This is bucket list material. Honestly, if you haven’t taken this drive, you need to ask yourself: Why am I living in Palm Beach County?

 9 sights to see:

1. As you’re heading south through Palm Beach, say hi to The Donald. You can usually get a brief eyeful of the architectural details and big gate of President Donald Trump’s shack, Mar-A-Lago (1100 S. Ocean Blvd.)

Related: A look inside Mar-A-Lago

The Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach is partially visible over its tall hedges on S. Ocean Boulevard. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
The Mar-a-Lago Club in Palm Beach is partially visible over its tall hedges on S. Ocean Boulevard. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

2. Most condos on this drive are tall and dramatically boring, with faux posh names, but we’re partial to two between Sloan’s Curve and Lake Worth: The ’60s mod-looking President of Palm Beach (2505 S. Ocean Blvd., not to be confused with Trump’s house) and the cool white Regency of Palm Beach (2760 S. Ocean Blvd.).

3. When you reach Lake Worth, take a quick left into the Lake Worth Beach complex (10 S. Ocean Blvd.). It’s a good place to grab a bite, and check out the ocean scene. Despite all the upgrades, the pier still looks vintage-funky.

4. As you pass through Manalapan, you get some nice glimpses of the Intracoastal. And ponder this: Have you ever driven this stretch of A1A when half of the oceanside properties are not in tear-down mode?

photo ocean inlet park
Ocean Inlet Park at Ocean Ridge. (Palm Beach Post file photo)

5. Between Manalapan and Ocean Inlet Park (6990 N. Ocean Blvd., Boynton Beach), there is a lovely, shady stretch of canopied trees and seagrape splendor. The beach-changing houses here along the ocean are probably nicer than your entire home. Roll down the window, take your foot off the gas and enjoy it.

6. Past Boynton, take a jog left on Corrine Street, right on Old Ocean Boulevard and head down to the marvelous mystery of A1A: How does a trailer town still exist here? With views of both the Atlantic and the Intracoastal? Briny Breezes is one of those places where you can test a relationship theory. Drive down tight little Hibiscus Street, with quaint mobile homes on both sides. By the time you get to the end at the town library and shuffleboard court, one spouse will be ready to chuck all the hassles of suburban home ownership and move right in. The other spouse will be ready to chuck you for suggesting it.

The Lake Worth Casino at Lake Worth Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
The Lake Worth Casino at Lake Worth Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

7. As you pass through the town of Gulf Stream, look up. Towering pines flank the roadway.

8. By this point in the trip, you may be weary of looking at condos blocking the ocean view. Delray Beach’s commercial district at Atlantic Avenue is made for a stop-and-shop. Or head down to Boca Raton’s numerous beach parks and the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center (1801 N. Ocean Blvd.).

9. You’re almost there. Past the Boca Raton Resort and Club and over the drawbridge and you’re into Deerfield Beach, the end of your journey. Except you have to turn around and go all the way back. But it was worth it, right?

orange-leaf-50

ROAD TRIP NO. 2: Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach

Length: 10-12 miles
Start/Stop: North Flagler near Northwood Road. Go south to South Flagler and Arlington Place.
Photo currie park
Currie Park on N. Flagler Drive in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: Beginning near the pastel-colored shopping and restaurant district along Northwood Road, this leisurely drive takes you past calming views of the Intracoastal, and the glittering downtown commercial district of condos, restaurants and waterside walkways. Once you get through downtown, settle into the most relaxing part of the drive, a non-stop travel reel of upscale homes with broad lawns, a mishmash of funky architectural styles, and a sweet walkway along the Intracoastal (though the road section south of Southern definitely needs repaving). By the time you get to South Flagler’s terminus at Arlington Place, your blood pressure should be a lot lower. And you can do it in less than an hour.
George S. Petty Park on Washington Road in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
George S. Petty Park on Washington Road in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)

5 sights to see:

1. Don’t miss the curved, copper-colored dome of Temple Beth El (2815 N. Flagler), built in 1970 and a hidden architectural jewel of the city.

2. Pull into Currie Park, at N. Flagler and 23rd Street, and watch boats speeding down the Intracoastal Waterway and people walking along the park’s well-maintained shoreline. (Other nearby sights include the Palm Beach Maritime Museum and the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial).

Palm Beach Maritime Museum on N. Flagler Drive in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
Palm Beach Maritime Museum on N. Flagler Drive in West Palm Beach. (Bruce R. Bennett / The Palm Beach Post)
3. When downtown (which might require a slight detour because of construction on the north bridge), stop and gawk at the mega-yachts perched at Palm Harbor Marina (400 N. Flagler).
4. Glimpse our favorite sign on a church: “No Skate Boarding Allowed” posted on the front of the historic First Church of Christ Scientist (809 S. Flagler), built in 1928 in a grandiose Classical Revival style, where the steep steps are apparently an irresistible temptation to board riders.
5. A moment of Zen: the pocket-like George S. Petty Park (Washington Road at Royal Park Road), though in truth all of the El Cid-Southland Park area is pretty Zen if you’re into gazing at expensive homes and condos. We’re partial to the tower-like house at Washington and Westminster. (An FYI on directions: Flagler turns into Washington, then converts back to Flagler via Greenwood Avenue a little farther south. Why? We don’t know, either.)
green-leaf-50

ROAD TRIP NO. 3: Jupiter to Juno Beach

Length: 15 miles
Start/Stop: Begin at U.S. 1 and Indiantown Road, Jupiter. Go south on U.S. 1 to A1A/Ocean Drive, Juno Beach. Then turn left/north on A1A all the way back to U.S. 1 and A1A, Jupiter.
photo jupiter lighthouse
Boats pass by Jupiter Lighthouse. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: This trip beginning on U.S. 1 south of Harbourside Place reflects a lot of what makes north county coastal living unique. There is the chance to see great swaths of dunes and undeveloped land in the middle of the usual commercial and residential development. Once you turn north onto A1A in Juno Beach, it’s a laid-back drive of condos, parks, seagrapes and glimpses of the Atlantic, all populated by north county’s legion of bicyclists, surfers and beachgoers. You’ll also eyeball such familiar landmarks as the Juno Beach Pier, Carlin Park and the Jupiter Lighthouse.
Pelican Lake. (Palm Beach Post file photo)
Pelican Lake. (Palm Beach Post file photo)

4 sights to see:

1. The Jupiter Ridge Natural Area(1800 S. U.S. 1), a 271-acre slash and scrub pine preserve that is worth a hike or run along its boardwalk and sandy trails. The county purchased it for $23 million in 1993. (A little farther down U.S. 1 is another stop and walk spot: the Juno Dunes Natural Area (14501 U.S. 1), as well as the Loggerhead Marine Life Center, 14200 U.S. 1).
2. In Juno Beach, make a quick right off A1A/Ocean Drive onto Celestial Way, the town center of Juno Beach. This is your Zen moment: A 1-mile pathway winds around Pelican Lake with two gazebos, and lots of ducks and wading birds to see. Stop and take a walk.
Diners enjoy the intracoastal views at Guanabanas restaurant in Jupiter. (Richard Graulich/The Palm Beach Post)
Diners enjoy the intracoastal views at Guanabanas restaurant in Jupiter. (Richard Graulich/The Palm Beach Post)
3. Right after the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, turn right on Jupiter Beach Park Road and take a winding ride through the beach park (1375 Jupiter Beach Road), which terminates with a gobsmacking view of the Jupiter Inlet and Atlantic Ocean. You can also walk here to adjacent Dubois Park, one of the best places to take in picture-perfect views of the Jupiter Lighthouse.
4. At the end of your trip, you hit the commercial bottleneck of restaurants and bars Guanabana’s Schooner’s, Square Grouper, Jetty’s, etc.). It might be worth it to end your ride here with a walk up tiny, funky Love Street (don’t miss the handpainted sign with lyrics to The Doors’ “Love Street”). With all the new commercial development plans, it may not stay funky for long.
orange-leaf-2-50

ROAD TRIP NO 4.: The Glades

Length: 37 miles
Start/Stop: Go west on Southern Boulevard past Lion Country Safari as it turns into U.S. 441. Once you get to the end of the road, turn right to Pahokee, where you can end your trip at Lake Okeechobee.
Royal palm trees line SR 715 in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
Royal palm trees line SR 715 in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: You can live in Palm Beach County for decades and rarely make a drive out to the Glades. That is a mistake. Head west on Southern Boulevard and, all of a sudden, it’s like the difference between watching a movie on an iPhone and seeing it blown up on an IMAX screen. The sky is bigger. The clouds are bigger. The horizon line of green fields and the Glades’ famous black muck soil goes on forever, interrupted only by giant power lines and the occasional belching smokestack. Driving out U.S. 441, you realize how much development blots out your broader vision of the world. Take your kids and have a teachable moment in how your food is grown and harvested.
A camper at the Pahokee Marina and Campground on Lake Okeechobee in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)
A camper at the Pahokee Marina and Campground on Lake Okeechobee in Pahokee. (Allen Eyestone / The Palm Beach Post)

2 sights to see:

1. Stop in at Paul Rardin Park (4600 State Road 715). A steep (very steep) road leads up to the boat ramp and an overlook of the lake. You can walk along the dike and join other park goers sitting on the bank and enjoying the scenery.
2. Driving into Pahokee, you might be surprised to find the road lined with as many palm trees as you’ll find on Palm Beach. Once you arrive downtown, turn left into the Pahokee Marina and Campground (190 N. Lake Ave.), a perfect place to gaze on the enormity of the big lake and end your road trip. (Wondering whether to invest the time? Hey, Bruce Springsteen made this trip on his chopper a couple years ago, and if it’s good enough for the Boss …)
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ROAD TRIP NO. 5: Dixie Highway through West Palm Beach/Lake Worth/Lantana

Length: 7. 2 miles
Start/Stop: S. Dixie Highway and Belvedere Road, West Palm Beach, south to Dixie Highway and Ocean Avenue, Lantana
West Palm Beach's Carvel ice cream cone sign on Dixie Highway. (Madeline Gray/The Palm Beach Post)
West Palm Beach’s Carvel ice cream cone sign on Dixie Highway. (Madeline Gray/The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: What’s scenic is in the eye of the beholder. Even a busy commercial highway has its charms. We could have picked Military Trail or, uh, I-95, but we recommend Dixie Highway because of its kitschy signs and architectural oddities. How this mishmash of businesses operates on Dixie is one of the wonders of this street, where quirky names abound — The Mad Hatter Lounge, the Tanks A Lot aquarium shop. Enjoy the broad range of commercial enterprises — ethnic restaurants and grocers, car repair shops, upscale antique stores, churches, funeral homes, an ice cream factory, dive bars, tattered remnants of Florida’s once-vibrant motor court culture and even Lake Worth City Hall (which once doubled as a movie set in the film “Body Heat.”)
Exterior of The Palm Beach Post building. (Riuchard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)
Exterior of The Palm Beach Post building. (Riuchard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)

3 sights to see:

1. The tour begins by going south on Dixie at The Palm Beach Post building (say Hi to us!) Immediately on your left is the first quirky sign you need to Instagram: the giant hammer on top of Hall Hardware (2750 S. Dixie), where Martha Stewart visited recently. More sweet sights in West Palm: the Howley’s restaurant logo sign at 4700 S. Dixie (“Cooked In Sight, Must Be Right”), and the double sky-high ice cream cones at Carvel (5901 S. Dixie).

Old Key Lime House in Lantana. (Bruce R. Bennett/The Palm Beach Post)
Old Key Lime House in Lantana. (Bruce R. Bennett/The Palm Beach Post)

2. Once you cross the line into Lake Worth, check out the crinkled pie-crust shaped lettering on The Upper Crust pie shop (2015 N. Dixie, Lake Worth), the pithy, pungent sayings on the Harry’s Banana Farm bar sign (1919 N. Dixie), the art deco, birthday cake-like curves of Blue Front BBQ (1132 N. Dixie), the cool jazz mural on the side of Chafin Music (608 N. Dixie), the big fish on top of Tuppen’s Marine and Tackle (1002 N. Dixie), and, of course, the big horse sitting on top of McLelland’s Inc. Saddlery (317 N. Dixie).

3. In Lantana, see the cute, old-school Barefoot Mailman Motel (138 S. Dixie in Lantana). And end your tour with a short jaunt east down Ocean Avenue in Lantana to behold the blindingly green exterior of the Old Key Lime House (300 E. Ocean Ave.)— it’s the perfect only-in-Florida end point to your funky drive.
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ROAD TRIP NO. 6: Jupiter Lighthouse to Jupiter Island

Length: 30 miles
Start/Stop: Begin at Indiantown Road and South Beach Road, Jupiter. Head east over the Intracoastal bridge, then veer north past Coral Cove Park and into Martin County. Once you pass through Jupiter Island, turn left/west at Bridge Road in Hobe Sound, then left/south on U.S. 1 back to Palm Beach County.
Areas around (and under) the beach access ramp, and in the dunes, at Coral Cove Park.
Areas around (and under) the beach access ramp, and in the dunes, at Coral Cove Park.
Why this drive delights: Jupiter Island and its endless enclaves of the wealthy is the north version of Palm Beach. You won’t see much, because of the towering landscaping, but that landscaping is divine, the drive is blissful and you can play a game of counting how many “Service Entrance” signs you spot. (Lots of bicyclists through here, so drive carefully.)

5 sights to see:

Large wave crashes on shore at Blowing Rocks Preserve. (Palm Beach Post file photo)
Large wave crashes on shore at Blowing Rocks Preserve. (Palm Beach Post file photo)

 

1. If you’ve never been to the 73-acre Blowing Rocks Preserve (574 South Beach Road), run by the Nature Conservancy, it’s worth a stop, especially if the water is spuming through the limestone rocks on the beach. It’s our mini-Big Sur.
2. On Jupiter Island, stay right on South Beach Road when it forks and make a quick stop at Christ Memorial Chapel (52 S. Beach Road), a Spanish-style church built in 1939. (Where else will you see a church that opens onto a broad golf course fairway?)
Ficus Nitida is the species of trees lining bridge road on Jupiter Island. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)
Ficus Nitida is the species of trees lining bridge road on Jupiter Island. (Damon Higgins / The Palm Beach Post)
3. When you reach South Beach Road and Estrada Drive, take a left and wind down a beautiful street of pretty houses that terminates at the Jupiter Island Club, 1 Estrada, with its gorgeous club building, manicured lawns and yacht dock. (And you’re not a member, so keep on driving.)
4. Back on South Beach Road, head past the Bridge Road intersection and go all the way to the terminus at the Hobe Sound National Wildlife Refuge. Check out the mountainous, perfectly sculpted dune/mound that separates the road from the beach.
5. Once you get to Bridge Road and U.S 1, turn south on U.S. 1 and take the semi-hilly drive back to Palm Beach County, past sparkling glimpses of the Intracoastal and more dunes at Jonathan Dickinson State Park (16450 SE Federal Highway). Bonus points if you can spot the nearby gated driveway to a certain Palm Beach County-bred movie star’s house.

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ROAD TRIP NO. 7: Central/North end of Palm Beach

Length: 12 miles
Start/Stop: Head north on Cocoanut Row at Royal Palm Way, past the Society of Four Arts and the Flagler Museum, across Royal Poinciana Way and down Bradley Place as it turns into North Lake Way. Turn left onto Country Club Road and head all the way up north past the Sailfish Club, then scoot over to North Ocean Boulevard and head south, as it turns into South County Road. End at Phipps Plaza and South County Road.
The coral cut on Country Club Road is on the west side of Palm Beach. (Meghan McCarthy/The Palm Beach Post)
The coral cut on Country Club Road is on the west side of Palm Beach. (Meghan McCarthy/The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: Hey, pretty much all of Palm Beach is a scenic getaway, and who doesn’t like to look at places you’ll never live? You can see a mix of eye-catching homes draped in towering landscaping (celebs like Rush Limbaugh and Howard Stern have abodes in the north end) and the tight roads are fun to drive.
5 sights to see:
1. When you turn onto Country Club Road from North Lake Way, behold one of the island’s most dazzling natural wonders: the deep coral cut that towers above both sides of the road (don’t forget to look for the Bastille-like prison window in the cut, which has prompted all sorts of urban legends, but is really just a water department door.). Coming out of the cut, you get a dazzling view of the Intracoastal along the Lake Trail (which you should walk or bike at some point) and the mega-yachts parked at boat yards on the West Palm side.
Susan and Chris Cristopoulos take a rest Thursday afternoon during their bike ride along the Lake Trail near the Palm Beach Country Club. (Palm Beach Post file photo)
Susan and Chris Cristopoulos take a rest Thursday afternoon during their bike ride along the Lake Trail near the Palm Beach Country Club. (Palm Beach Post file photo)
2. Once you get to Arabian Road, curve left as it becomes Indian Road, then jog north on N. Ocean Boulevard to check out the northernmost point of the island and the short dock, where you can see cruise ships heading out to the Atlantic.
3. Heading back south on N. Ocean, enjoy more winding curves, glimpses of Atlantic (especially around the Palm Beach Country Club) and keep up with the construction teardowns and buildups that always seem to be happening on the north end.
The Breakers.
The Breakers.
4. The leisurely drive continues south past a shady canopy of trees between Phipps Estate Road and Sanford Avenue, and such local sights as Green’s Pharmacy, St. Edward’s Church, the old Paramount Theater complex, The Breakers and Bethesda-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church, all worth a visit.
5. End your trip on one of our favorite pocket roads by turning right off S. County Road into Phipps Plaza, a cute little roundabout of architectural offices and tucked-away homes and no parking spots for the hoi-polloi. This is Palm Beach, after all.

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ROAD TRIP NO. 8: Wellington

Length: 8 miles
Start/stop: Turn off Southern Boulevard onto Bink’s Forest Drive, and drive up to Aero Club Drive. Take a right there and head down to Greenbrier Shores Boulevard, where you can turn right into the Aero Club neighborhood.
An airplane parked in the Aero Club in Wellington. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)
An airplane parked in the Aero Club in Wellington. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)

 

Why this drive delights: It’s not every housing development that boasts airplane hangar garages, and it’s unusual to see planes parked as casually as Cadillacs in back yards. And don’t forget to check out the fun street names — Boing Street, Lindbergh Lane, Take Off Place, etc.
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ROAD TRIP NO. 9: Lake Osborne to High Ridge Road

Length: 6.5 miles
Start/Stop: Turn off Lake Worth Road onto Lake Osborne Drive. Once you reach Lantana Road, double back and turn right on High Ridge Road, ending at Hypoluxo Road.
Lake Osborne Park on the west side of High Ridge Road, south of Lantana Road. (Thomas Cordy/The Palm Beach Post)
Lake Osborne Park on the west side of High Ridge Road, south of Lantana Road. (Thomas Cordy/The Palm Beach Post)
Why this drive delights: This is a scenic waterfront drive that reminds you of Old Florida. Revel in a leisurely, miles-long ride around the other big Lake O in the county.
 2 sights to see:
1. On Lake Osborne Drive, past the entrance to John Prince Park, there are plenty of spots to pull your car over and watch fishermen on the lake, or join the sidewalk parade. The apartment complexes and houses aren’t your usual waterfront property — they’re older, more middle-class, not Mega-Mansion land, as though somehow developers were not given the secret password to come here, tear down and overbuild. (And this quiet, neighborhood feel is what some people are worried about losing if the Atlanta Braves build a spring training complex at John Prince.)
John Prince Park.
John Prince Park.
2. High Ridge Road is a sweet, short, semi-hilly drive (hence the name.) Just past High Ridge and Hypoluxo Road, visit the High Ridge Natural Scrub Area (7300 High Ridge Rd.), another pocket nature preserve where you can stretch your legs and end your journey.
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Trump’s Mar-A-Lago paintings back in news after presidential debate

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One of the weirder sideshows of the presidential season is all the attention paid to portraits of Donald Trump.

At Wednesday night’s debate, Trump attacked Hillary Clinton over donations accepted by her family’s Clinton Foundation. She sparred back, mentioning his use of money by the Trump Foundation:

“I’d be happy to compare what (the Clinton Foundation does) with the Trump Foundation, which took money from other people and bought a 6-foot portrait of Donald. I mean, who does that? It just was astonishing.”

Clinton was referring to a six-foot tall portrait of Trump by Palm Beach County artist Michael Israel. The Washington Post reported that Trump Foundation money was used by Trump to buy the portrait during an auction at his Palm Beach mansion-club, Mar-A-Lago.

As Post reporter Jennifer Sorentrue wrote in a story on the controversy:

The 2007 painting sold for $20,000. According to Israel and press reports, Trump’s wife, Melania, bid $10,000 for the piece, before the auctioneer pushed her to double that number. The Donald J. Trump Foundation cut the check for the artwork, raising questions about whether the foundation broke IRS rules by bidding on an item that might have benefited Trump directly.

The charity auction was for the local non-profit HomeSafe, which helps children with housing issues. Since that story broke, Israel painted another portrait of Trump to help HomeSafe raise money. With a minimum bid of $15,000, nobody bid on the portrait and the online auction was closed.

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This isn’t the only story recently about a Trump painting. Reporters have been buzzing all election season about a Trump portrait hanging in the bar at Mar-A-Lago and the backstory of why Trump insisted that the hand on the portrait be repainted.

You can read the full story of that here:

Why did Trump insist artist repaint his hand on Mar-A-Lago portrait?